[Last Call] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 760
  • Last Modified:

MIME and S/MIME definition

Hi

Can someone explain to me - in layman's terms - what MIME and S/MIME are? In particular, how they fit around Exchange/ email clients and anything they affect regarding message size?

Cheers!
0
kam_uk
Asked:
kam_uk
  • 4
  • 3
1 Solution
 
tigermattCommented:

MIME stands for Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions, and is essentially a system which extends the original email specification to support modern day emailing technologies. For example, the MIME system enables non-text attachments (images, for example) to be sent quite safely through email. It also enables you to send emails containing non-ASCII text; the original specification, written many years ago, even before the first Windows computer, supported ASCII text only. http://email.about.com/cs/standards/a/mime.htm

S/MIME is a further extension to the MIME standards, which was developed by RSA and enables a MIME email to be digitally signed and encrypted for secure transmission over the web.

With relation to message size, the introduction of MIME means users can send non-text attachments more easily. While it could be done before, the process was manual. With MIME, it is automated, which is just about the only impact on message size I can think of. However, MIME has been used for such a long time it is really considered as though it is standard anyway.

-Matt
0
 
kam_ukAuthor Commented:
Hi Matt

Thanks...so is this like a form of compression?
0
 
tigermattCommented:

Not really. Essentially it automates the procedure of attaching files to emails, images in signatures, using non-ASCII and international characters and many other things.

Take an example. Long before my time when emails were first introduced and the RFC for them was written, the RFC was a little restrictive. Based on that RFC, only ASCII text can be used, and if you wanted to attach a file to an email, you'd have to open your image file in a Text Editor to see the raw make-up, manually copy the data to the message, send it and then the person at the other end would have to automatically convert the data back into the appropriate file... a little tedious!

So the MIME system was introduced which automates the attaching of files, and extends the RFC, which essentially means that a MIME-capable email utility can process attachments automatically and work in foreign alphabets and languages. The term 'MIME type' originated from this system. As you know, every document has a MIME type - an HTML file is text/html, an Excel Workbook I believe is application/vnd.ms-excel (although Microsoft's MIME types can get a bit complicated!). The MIME type is inserted by the sending email client when it processes the attachment, to tell the remote end (which also abides by the MIME specification) what type of file to convert the attachment back to.

I hope this makes sense.

-Matt
0
Simplify Active Directory Administration

Administration of Active Directory does not have to be hard.  Too often what should be a simple task is made more difficult than it needs to be.The solution?  Hyena from SystemTools Software.  With ease-of-use as well as powerful importing and bulk updating capabilities.

 
kam_ukAuthor Commented:
Thanks...

So if the message was just plain text, there would be any MIME encoding/decoding?

And the MIME encoding/decoding only takes place at the first mail server and the last? So, if the mail went from;

User > Exchange1 > SMTP Gateway > INTERNET > SMTPGateway2 > Exchange2 > Recipient

MIME encoding is only involved at Exchange1 and Exchange2?

Thanks
0
 
tigermattCommented:

Hey,

Plain Text = ASCII = No MIME required. MIME is only necessary when a feature we love and use, but that isn't included in the RFC, is used.

> User > Exchange1 > SMTP Gateway > INTERNET > SMTPGateway2 > Exchange2 > Recipient

As far as I am aware, that is correct. An SMTP relay server just relays the mail, so it's not going to need to encode and decode it when it has no reason to do so.

-Matt
0
 
kam_ukAuthor Commented:
Excellent answers, and thanks for your patience :)
0
 
tigermattCommented:

Don't worry about it. We both gain in the long run, and that's the main thing!

Cheers,
-Matt
0

Featured Post

New feature and membership benefit!

New feature! Upgrade and increase expert visibility of your issues with Priority Questions.

  • 4
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now