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Need more ip addresses

Posted on 2008-11-03
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Last Modified: 2012-05-05
We are currently setup on the 192.168.100.X 255.255.255.0. We have more devices currently than we have available IP addresses. We have been talked to about load balancing, supernetting vs. subnetting.... all of which sails just over our heads. We are in a critical situation as we have classrooms of students with no connection to computers making school tough. We are looking for a detailed solution that will allow all students to use our server, networked printers and internet connection. Any help would be grand.....
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Question by:jrsnork
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by:jazzIIIlove
ID: 22872867
>>Need more ip addresses

virtual IP is what you are in search for:

An IP address that is shared among multiple domain names or multiple servers. Virtual IP addressing enables one IP address to be used either when insufficient IP addresses are available or as a means to balance traffic to multiple servers in a server farm.

How to configure:

http://www.adventnet.com/products/simulator/help/sim_network/netsim_conf_virtual_ip.html
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cybersean earned 2000 total points
ID: 22873017
There are quite a few different options, but it basically down comes down to subnetting.  You say that you are on the 192.168.100.x network.  This is a Class C subnet and only offers 254 devices.  (0-255 = 256 minus one for the network and minus one for broadcast = 254 devices)  To keep it short and sweet, I would change to the 172.16.x.x network.  Your network would be 172.16.x.x with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0.  This is a class B subnet and gives you around 65,535 devices.  Like I said though, there are so many different ways to subnet your existing network.  You mentioned that the basic stuff sails over your head.  With that in mind, I would really just recommend an onsite computer guy or networking company to come out and set it up for you.  You should expect to pay about $75 to $100 hour for them to come out.  
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by:jrsnork
ID: 22873427
is it as simple as changing our setup to 172.16.x.x with a subnet of 255.255.0.0 and letting our DHCP server pass out the addresses we need? What are the draw backs of this setup?
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by:cybersean
ID: 22873716
It is as simple as changing to the 172.16.x.x network, but it may involve alot of work.  So simple yes, quick maybe/maybe not.  There are some other considerations that may be unique to your situation.  You'll want to make sure you move all static ips to that network, change the scope of your dhcp server, change the options (such as dns server settings, default gateway, etc) on the new dhcp scope.  Is your dns server setup for dynamic updates?  If not, you'll have to manually update dns records.  Do you have any client computer applications that connect to a server by ip instead of name (because they will need to be configured to point to that server's new ip)?  I really don't really see any long term drawbacks of any serious significance.  If anything, your broadcasts will generate more traffic as it will be sent out to every node that is connected.  However, you really don't have that many nodes to deal with, so the increased traffic will be slight.  (to avoid this, you could set up multiple networks and route between them.  such as one network of 192.168.100.x and another as 192.168.101.x.  That involves a whole bunch of other considerations as well).  I think switching to a class b network is the simplest for your situation.  Once you get all the basic configurations complete, you'll be set for a long time before you start running into issues with the one BIG network.
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by:Rowley
ID: 22874880
I'd keep the /24 and start routing between networks. Start the 192.168.101/24 and route between them on your core switches. It's going to be a *lot* less painful than switching to a /16 (255.255.0.0) mask, and being a school network administrator, I bet your lot are already seriously overworked and underpaid.

It's not as simple as changing your scope addresses by the way. You'll need to change your entire network addressing assignments on each host, update naming services, ensure there are no hard coded addresses in applications anywhere, flush all cache's...some basics of the top of my head - no trivial thing.
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by:jrsnork
ID: 22877267
Ok the routing between is seeming a better solution as we are yes overworked and underpaid. Also hiring outside is not in our budget which is why I am here asking all of you. So what is needed to route between two networks?
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by:Rowley
ID: 22877673
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