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Help understanding how domain users can be setup for local server permissions on Win2003

I have setup a departmental PC with Windows Server 2003 for 5 local users who use WinXP and support users that are non local that use WinXP as well.  The server is used to share Excel Spreadsheets and documents.  The server belongs to a corporate domain and the users are all part of this domain.

I, however do not have access to the domain servers.  Just the local Win2003 server.

Would like to set up the server to allow viewing of spreadsheets and documents for the domain users and also allow the local users and support staff to have write permissions.

Is there anyway to accomplish this with only the local Win2003 server access?

A recommendation for book titles that explain Active Directory to a beginner would also be appreciated.

Thanks...

Steve
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ServerDumkoff
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ServerDumkoff
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1 Solution
 
ryansotoCommented:
Well in this case you would just set up a file share thne you would assign permissions to the folder.
IE allow user group X access to read write, etc
Do you know how to create file shares on the machines?
You will need to be an admin of the local server or a domain admin to log onto it and create file shares...
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samiam41Commented:
Steve, is this server just apart of a workgroup?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
So let me just clarify, all the users that would be connecting to this server (to access the shares that you set up) are or are not members of the domain?

When you say you have access to the local Windows 2003 server, do you have an administrative account that you can log in under to make changes?

Here is a series of Technet articles that will introduce you to Active Directory (AD). I will post some links to books in a bit.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc758436.aspx
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samiam41Commented:
That is where I was going with my question.  I wasn't sure if the users of Domain X will be able to be added to a server that is in a workgroup.  Wouldn't a trust be required at a minimum which would involve the AD Admin?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Well, you can do a lot of different things in a Domain / Workgroup hybrid with pass-through authentication and such. I have to see how the author answers my questions before I can speculate further.
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samiam41Commented:
Understand
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ServerDumkoffAuthor Commented:
Answers to a few clarification questions posed in response to my original question.

The server is not part of a workgroup (as I understand workgroups), it has been installed as part of the corporate domain.  I have admin access through the local admininstrator account on the Win2003 server.
All users sign into the domain on their workstations and then they map the shared server folder for access to the required spreadsheets and documents.

The Windows 2003 version being used is the R2 Standard Edition.

Thanks... Steve
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ryansotoCommented:
Then in this case I would go with my method....Log onto the server as the admin and set up file shares
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324267

Once done have your workstations either map the drives or manually browse to the file shares
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dfxdeimosCommented:
When people log into their computers (the ones that they want to access the spreadsheets from) at your location, do they log in with DOMAIN accounts or LOCAL accounts on each machine?
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ServerDumkoffAuthor Commented:
The users log into their computers using domain accounts.

...Steve
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Ok, so you will want to do the following:

1) Log into the Server 2003 machine with your local admin account.
2) Choose a spot and create the folder that you want to put the shared content in (Perhaps C:\Share or D:\Share).
3) Right click on the folder that you chose in the above step and choose Properties.
4) Click on the "Sharing" tab.
5) Select the radio button next to "Share this folder".
6) Click on the "Permissions" button.
7) If "Everyone" is already listed skip to step 9.
8) Click "Add" and type "Everyone" and then click OK.
9) Highlight "Everyone" in the list of permissions and check the box next to "Full Control".
10) Click OK.
11) We are still in the "Properties" window of the folder we are sharing.
12) Click on the "Security" tab.
13) Here is where you have to decide how you want to restrict the permissions for access to this share. If you want everyone to be able to just read / modify whatever they want (and you trust them to do so) then you can also grant "Everyone" full control here as well.

Now you should be able to navigate (from any of the workstations) to "\\ServerName\NameOfFolderYouShared". There is your shared folder.
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ServerDumkoffAuthor Commented:
dfxdeimos,

Thank you for your step by step instructions but I guess I wasn't completely clear on what I need.

I have already setup a shared folder on the server and ALL domain users have full access to the spreadsheets and documents (read and write).

What I want to do, is to setup up a small group of users (that are part of the group of domain users) with full control of these files.  Everyone else in the domain will only be allowed to read the files.

Thanks...
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dfxdeimosCommented:
You cannot create groups because you don't have domain admin access, so you are going to have to add all the users you want to the folder's security tab and give them all "Full Control" there.

If you had access to the domain I would suggest you create a security group that contains all the users and then you just add the group.
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