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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 - How to grant another user root permission (without having to use su -)

I need to know how to give another general user, root permissions so that I don't need to type su - in order to get root privileges. I want the user to login using their username, but have full root access as if they were logging in as root.

For example, I don't want this user to be prompted every time an administrative function needs to be performed.
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fcgsupport
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fcgsupport
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1 Solution
 
woolmilkporcCommented:
Hi,
use 'sudo'
It's perfect for your purposes.

http://www.courtesan.com/sudo/

wmp
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fcgsupportAuthor Commented:
I said I need this to happen without using SU, SUDO, SU - or any variation of SU.

Thanks!
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woolmilkporcCommented:
You only said 'su'
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Seems you don't understand sudo, or haven't even looked at it.
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TintinCommented:
Can you explain your reasons for not wanting to use su or sudo.  It doesn't make sense to me.
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fosiul01Commented:
why are you not puttying that user in root groups

or create a groups call admin, give this groups full permission of the system

now put user in that groups, so as a part of that groups that user would get all the permission as root user
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TintinCommented:
In answer to your original question, you can just change the uid of the user to 0, but as has been pointed out in many threads on similar topics, this is certainly NOT recommended.
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Hugh FraserConsultantCommented:
"sudo" is the cleanest alternative, providing not only fine control over what root rights are given, but also providing an audit trail. If you want to make it transparent, define aliases for the functions you allow. For example,,

alias route="sudo /sbin/route"

coupled with an entry in the /etc/sudoers file with the NOPASSWD option will allow the user to use the standard route command.
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fcgsupportAuthor Commented:
Thanks Tintin,

I read about using the '0' uid method. I tried this, but during login, there are some strange /home/username access issues. I have also tried to create a new user using useradd -u 0 -o -p password username, but it will not accept my password at login.

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omarfaridCommented:
if you have specific command to run as root, then you give that user permission to run it as root with the set uid priv.

chmod u+s command

and this command (the file) should be owned by root.

If you can give a specific need then it might be easier to give you solution
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nabeelmoiduCommented:
if its typing sudo for each command  that u don't like, then sudo su - once will make ur user as good as a root user. its a one time command and you are like root for the rest of the time...
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