SBS2003 R2 SMTP Reverse DNS Lookup

Does the ICW setup the proper Reverse DNS lookup when sending SMTP mail?

Most clients in our area are ATT DSL static IP.  Occasionally we get bounces that may advise DNS reverse lookup.

How can I check to see if it is set properly and where do we go to set it up in SBS (ICW?)
Thanks
Bruce
BBraytonAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
>>Does the ICW setup the proper Reverse DNS lookup when sending SMTP mail?

Not really this usually this is handled by your ISP

You can check your MX records use mxtoolbox http://www.mxtoolbox.com/
0
epohlCommented:
The reverse DNS they are referring to is a PTR record for your external IP address. This will have to be setup by your ISP. You can check the mail server PTR record using the site below.

http://www.mxtoolbox.com/diagnostic.aspx
0
Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
isnt that exactly what I already said?
0
Check Out How Miercom Evaluates Wi-Fi Security!

It's not just about Wi-Fi connectivity anymore. A wireless security breach can cost your business large amounts of time, trouble, and expense. Plus, hear first-hand from Miercom on how WatchGuard's Wi-Fi security stacks up against the competition plus a LIVE demo!

epohlCommented:
sorry was typing mine as you posted. Great minds think alike.
0
Tee CChief Know IT AllCommented:
As PeterLong and epohl have said above Reverse DNS requires what is called a PTR record or pointer record.

This is usually handled by your ISP as they are responsible for assigning your external IP address to you. You should request your ISP create a PTR record by providing them with your mail servers FQDN (likely mail.yourdomain.com) and it's external IP address.

The PTR record is often the same as the MX record for your mail server, but not always, as the PTR record is used for mail coming from your domain whereas the MX record is used for mail going to your domain which can be different servers. However, in your case, as you are using SBS you will only have the one Exchange server so your PTR record should be made up of the same details as your MX record.
0
BBraytonAuthor Commented:
So what is the experience with asking ATT to accomplish this?

At the web sites we generally have an MX record point to an A record which has the IP of the server.  So we should advise the ISP, ATT in this case to create a PTR record to the server IP?
0
epohlCommented:
If these are business accounts ATT will do this. Yes request they create a DNS PTR record for that IP to the FQDN of the server.
0
BBraytonAuthor Commented:
In the essence of trying not to get the corporate run around from ATT has anyone had the experience in doing this with them.  Not sure if this is Tech Support Call (low end techs) or a business office request.

Thanks
Bruce
0
epohlCommented:
Technical support will handle this just fine. Just be prepared to wait as AT&T is not in a hurry to do anything.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Email Protocols

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.