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IIS 7.0 site permissions in network share

Hi, I've got a Windows 2008 server I'm using as a front end web server running IIS 7.0. The back end file server has a share with all of the site roots on it. The web server is running the sites with the root being the network share specified as "\\server\share\root_folder". I can get the sites to work, but how do I make them work with databases (Access files) on the file server? How do I allow set permissions to make this work? The web server needs to be able to write the file. I am using "connect as" authentication for the share and have NTFS permissions set for IUSR on those files. The share permissions are set to Everyone - Full Control.  Both machines are on the same domain and the web server is set "connect as" for the authentication with a Domain Admin account (yes, I know. It's just for now).

Thanks!
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Pugglewuggle
Asked:
Pugglewuggle
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3 Solutions
 
dfxdeimosCommented:
Have you propogated DOMAIN\Administrator full control to all files and folder beneath the site root?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
both in share and NTFS permissions.
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Yes
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dfxdeimosCommented:
And the account that the ApplicationPool in IIS (for the websites in question) are running under an account that is granted access to those shares?
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
I don't really know how the app pool stuff works... (do you have any good sites that describe this?)
What would I be looking for?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Here is an explaination of an Application Pool:

http://faq.oneandone.co.uk/server/ms_windows_servers/miscellaneous/1.html

In IIS 7 you would go Start -> Run -> "inetmgr" Press Enter then you would see an Application Pools section that you could expand. Each Application Pool corresponds (for the most part) to a virtual directory in IIS. In the properties of that application pool you can configure under what account / authority it will run. Depending on which account it runs under it will have different access restrictions (based upon what you grand that particular account).

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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
It's in the default app pool. The user is the NetworkService account.
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dfxdeimosCommented:
And you have granted the network service account access to those files?
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
That does not appear to fix the issue. Sorry I didn't post it originally, but the error I'm getting is:

ADODB.Connection error '800a0e7a'
Provider cannot be found. It may not be properly installed.  
I have installed the Office 2007 Data Connectivity Components on the webserver which is the database provider.
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=7554F536-8C28-4598-9B72-EF94E038C891&displaylang=en
The reason I think this is permissions related is that the exact same code runs on another server with the exact site/IIS/OS configuration except that this server uses remote paths.
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Can you, as a test, copy the content locally and then set the path for the IIS directory to the newly copied files and see if it works?
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Interesting... I'm still getting the same error... any ideas? I suppose that means the driver isn't working.
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Just to confirm, this is a 32 bit server?
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Hmm... no it's not. This one is 64-bit... the other server it's working on is 32 bit.
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Read through this thread and see if their suggestions help you:

http://forums.devshed.com/asp-programming-51/800a0e7a-error-on-win-server-2003-x64t-314521.html
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Well, that sounds like what's going on, but no suggestions are offered. :-P
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Okay, so basically from reading a good bit, there's no way to do this in x64. I have to use a 32-bit OS if I want to run access databases with the Jet driver. Is this right?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Doh, sorry.

What I was looking at was:
------------------------------------
It's important to understand which kind of DSN you have. On an x64 system, you can create an ODBC connection(DSN) on the 32-bit side of the system or on the 64-bit side of the system. 32-bit applications will only see ODBC connections created in the 32-bit side, and 64-bits applications will only see ODBC connections from the 64-bit side. Each kind of application has is own registry.  
 
To setup DSN for 32-bit application you must use:  
%WINDIR%\SysWOW64\odbcad32.exe  

and for 64-bit application you must use:  
%WINDIR%\System32\odbcad32.exe  
------------------------------------

I am basically seeing that there is no native implementation of ODBC drivers for access databases in Server 2008 x64. You may have to use the workaround that is linked in this thread:

http://forums.iis.net/t/1147139.aspx
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
This isn't an ASP.NET app... it's classic ASP. Is there nothing for this?
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
A ha! GOT IT! I messed around for a bit and then changed Enable 32-bit Applications to true in the applicable app pool and restarted IIS. That did it!

Untitled.jpg
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Thanks for everything though!
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Good job!
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Actually - one quick question - what's the advantage of having mulitple app pools? Is it better to just use one?
I meant to give you some points... let me send a request...
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Using different application pools for different sites / applications (as far as I know) has a couple benefits:

1) You are seperating the processes for different web applications, so if one crashes the other can continue to operate.

2) You can define different access restrictions based on the authority under which the different application pools run, which gives you more granular control over your security infrastructure.

I prefer to use different AppPools for different Virtual Directories / Web Apps.
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Gotcha... so for regular websites it would probably be fine to stick them all in the same app pool? And then separate web apps? On a development server I guess it would be okay to stick everything in the same app pool for development simplicity?
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Yeah, those are both reasonable statements.
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PugglewuggleAuthor Commented:
Moderator: please kill my request to close the question. I'd like to accept my answer as the solution to the problem and then give some points to dfx for helping and for the info about app pools.
Thanks!
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dfxdeimosCommented:
Make that three reasonable assumptions. =]
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