Windows Program dialog displays incorrectly

I've written a C# program that displays a dialog.  

On every computer that I've used it displays correctly.  

The issue is that someone using the program is oddly only able to see half the dialog.

(see attached image)

I'm guessing that there is some setting difference between their computer and ours but I'm not sure what?

I have XP Pro, SP2, it works in all screen resolutions.  

The problem is on  XP Pro; with a wide screen laptop; screen resolution: 1680x1050  

QUESTION: Why this happening?   How can I fix it?

Thanks,


Scott-S-Test.doc
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psftAsked:
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Fernando SotoConnect With a Mentor RetiredCommented:
Try a test on your system. Set the resolution down to 800 X 600 which is a standard low resolution setting and see if you get the same results.
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torimarCommented:
It sometimes happens that display problems arise when users don't choose small or large system fonts (in the advanced display settings), but customize the size. Then, however, you see text running out of labels or not fitting onto buttons and all sort of visual mess.

In your case, this is a clear cut. So clear a cut that I should say it looks like being set up for display on dual monitors. But that, of course, your user should know.

This may sound far fetched, but are you absolutely certain they aren't playing a trick on you?
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Hi psft;

A couple of questions.

When you developed the program what was the Screen resolution set to on your system?
What is the size of the form when correctly displayed?
What is the screen resolution of the systems that it does work correctly?
What is the screen resolution of the systems that it does NOT work correctly?

Fernando
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psftAuthor Commented:
I'm sure it's not a joke. . . .

I tried changing screen resolution, and switching to dual monitors with no luck being able to recreate it.
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Not sure the exact screen resolution it was developed with.

The size of the form is expanded and reduced in the program with the largest the dialog is everbeing:
730, 580

They are having problems and just happen to be on 1680x1050 resolution

I have had it work on every resolution of mine: 1280x1024 , etc . . .  even 1920x1200
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
To your statement, "Not sure the exact screen resolution it was developed with.", If it was on your machine that it was developed on, what is the resolution setting?

To your statement, "The size of the form is expanded and reduced in the program with the largest the dialog is ever being: 730, 580", When you open the application in the Development Environment what is the Forms size, With and Height ?

When you run the application on the system that it does NOT work on, What resolution is that system set to?

What I am trying to determine is that the Form size when developed is set to lets say 850 X 610. Then the program is installed on a system who's Resolution is set to 800 X 600. This will cause the form border to fill the visible screen but the controls will be off the screen area.

Fernando
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psftAuthor Commented:
?1.  developed with 1280x1024

?2.  width: 730,  height 580 in dev environment

?3. end user resolution of 1680x1050

I don't have access to the PC that is not working, but I'm guessing it's a font or dual monitor issue as suggested previously, but I haven't heard back from the user yet.  

Thanks for all the input, let me know if you have any other ideas.

~Adam


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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Hi psft;

To your statement, "I don't have access to the PC that is not working, but I'm guessing it's a font or dual monitor issue as suggested previously, but I haven't heard back from the user yet." If it were a Font issue I would think the the size of the font being displayed would be clipped along the borders of the controls and not that all the controls would get larger to accommodate the font size. As far as being a dual monitor it would not re-sized the controls seeming that the total resolution would most likely be larger then the form being displayed because the total resolution is the sum of both screens.

Fernando
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psftAuthor Commented:
That makes sense. . .     could it be something with the video / graphics card?   What else can I try?
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Well the only thing I can think of right now is the resolution mismatch. As far as being a video / graphics card problem, must video cards now a day is Microsoft certified which means that it had to of passed some test to operate as they would expect so most likely not the cause but you can ask the end user for the manufacture and model of the video card and see if it is or not. If it is not you may want to take a standard video card down to the end user and try a different card.
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psftAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the input, hopefully we here back from the the end user soon so I can verify.
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
I have noticed that the  image you have posted is approximately 497 pixels wide by 720 pixels high. Is that what this form size is actually?
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torimarConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>>"What else can I try?"

The only 100% safe way of avoiding unwelcome problems like this which you cannot possibly anticipate on your developing system is to create strictly resolution independent applications.
This involves having the exact size and exact position of form elements and controls be computed at runtime, not designtime.

In other words: in your application startup, you query the resolution of the system it is running on (look into "SystemInformation.PrimaryMonitorSize" here or similar functions), then you apply this data in calculating the appearance of your form before it displays. This calculation has to be repeated in any OnPaint/OnRedraw events.

Searching for "Resolution independent" on MSDN gives me 834 hits:
http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Search/en-US/?query=%22resolution%20independent%22&ac=3
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Fernando SotoConnect With a Mentor RetiredCommented:
Hi psft;

Resolution Independence is available on Windows Vista and above. If you need to have resolution independence on Windows OS before Vista you could use a product like .Net Forms Resize info below. With dropping a component onto a window form at design time will re-size the form automatically. I have not used this product or have any interest in the company. They have a download link in which you can try it before buying it.

Company: SoftGroup Components
Product:    .Net Forms Resize
http://www.soft-group.it/net/index.php?c=3

From there Web Page:
With Softgroup .Net Forms Resize you can

· Gives your Windows Forms applications resolution independence.
· Keep your controls font/size proportion whenever your forms are resized
· Can be easily implemented to already designed forms with 1 line of code
· Support controls nested inside others
· Can centerl form over the Desktop or MDI Parent
· Can save/resotre your form's last size and positions.
· Resizes fonts as well as the controls themselves
· Ability to specify whether the fonts of the controls will be resized or not.
· Control resize of docked controls like ToolStrip and StatusStrip.
· Support of standard .Net Windows Form, MDI child and MDI parent Forms.
· Fast, small and accurate resize engine.

Fernando
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psftAuthor Commented:
Still waiting for End-User response . . . .   I will get points out . . .
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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
Not a problem.
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psftAuthor Commented:
After a few weeks I have not been able to reach the end-user to confirm that the change in resolution fixed the problem, but it is my best guess that that was the case.  

The ideas for developing with Resolution Independence were also great and worth noting.  

Thanks for the input!
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