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Software binaries of on one server can be replaced with other server binaries

Posted on 2008-11-16
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dear experts,
If the same software has been installed in two servers, if the one server software has been corrupted because of virus then can I replace the same software binaries from other server? Consider both OS of same version with rest of attributes.  

Please reply what would be the behavior in case of  
1 - Windows  windows
2  Linux  Linux  
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Question by:mansur_mca
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Tintin earned 300 total points
ID: 22971387
1.  The software may rely on registry settings, so simply replacing the binaries may be problematic.

2.  If the software was installed by a package manager, then you'll lose the ability to maintain it via the package management tools.  Apart from that, if you restore all the required files, then it should operate just fine.
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by:mansur_mca
ID: 22971434
dear tintin.
Can you please elaborate about the second point?

We are not installed any kind of package manger. Just it simple and standard.
Ur reply >> Apart from that, if you restore all the required files, then it should operate just fine.

Means, can I conclude as below
1- Restoration of the backup which has taken on the same server can only be replaceable specific to that server and should not use this backup for other server.
Other words, Backup taken on server cant be restored on the other server.  


Any Linux experts,
Please share you views what would this scenario on the Linux platform.

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by:Tintin
ID: 22971472
Are you talking about a complete restore of the system from a backup or just certain binaries?
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by:mansur_mca
ID: 22971488
not complete restoration of the system.
just i am talking about for one software for example -  SQL server
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by:Hugh Fraser
Hugh Fraser earned 300 total points
ID: 22971771
Copying an executable from one Linux system to another will work assuming both systems are from the same distribution, version, and patch levels. I'm assuming, from your question, that we're talking about replacing one file in a package that's been corrupted somehow, and other resources it depends upon are still there.

Make sure that file permissions and ownership are correct. Also, if you have SELINUX enabled, you will probably need to re-label the file once it's copied over.
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by:mansur_mca
ID: 22972628
from both the above answers i can understand that it is quite different for windows and Linux.
while incase of windows we just can't copy software binaries as they are tied up registry
whereas in Linux, it is possible.

if any one wants to share the views more on this?
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by:macker-
macker- earned 150 total points
ID: 23001122
I'm really unsure of why anyone is considering registry settings, since we're talking about a Linux system, and Linux isn't afflicted by the "registry" in this manner.

Assuming you are copying the same file, same version, etc., then yes, this will work perfectly fine.  Make sure the permissions match.  You can use 'scp -p' to preserve permissions, and tar will do the same.

If the file is part of an RPM package, you can do `rpm -qf /path/to/file` to identify which package it's in, and you can do `rpm -V packagename` to verify the files have the right permissions, that the checksum matches, etc.

If you use something like ftp to copy the file, make sure it's in binary mode, not ASCII mode.

Just do make sure the files are the exact same versions.  E.g. check other (non-modified) files, and do `md5sum filename`on each side; make sure they match.  Similarly, `cat /etc/*-release` will show the installed version and release of many Linux distributions.
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by:Tintin
ID: 23001602
We're talking about registry settings as that's what Windows uses for software installs.  If you read the question, it was related to Linux AND Windows servers.

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by:Hugh Fraser
ID: 23002930
In addition to macker's comments about using RPM to find the package that contains a given file, you can also use YUM to see what the appropriate packages are for your version of Linux using

yum provides path-to-file
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by:mansur_mca
ID: 23032634
dear experts,

any other want to contribute their opinions on this thread?
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