Finding Autosaved file for powerpoint on a Mac

I am working on a powerpoint presentation on my mac. The mac froze and I had to force quit and reboot the mac. My last save was 2hrs previous but autosave was set for 10mins. I'm usually a save often nut but didn't this time. I can't seem to find the folder for recovering this file and it didn't appear when I re-opened powerpoint. How do I recover Auto saved files?
kilr_vAsked:
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MiniDevoCommented:
What version of the Mac OS are you running?
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jckingjcCommented:
Hi kilr_v,

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The file path is
UserName:Library:Preferences:Microsoft:Microsoft:PowerPoint Temp

The file might be hidden. PowerPoint looks for this file when it opens,
and if it finds it then it will open the file with the name "Recovered
File ..."

================

I know this is an old subject but I had the same problem with powerpoint 2004 and finally managed to find where the "powerpoint temp" was.
It was there:

ls -al /.Trashes/

You need to be superuser (root) to have access to this (as administrator type "sudo -s" in your terminal, insert admin password and you become superuser), the "-al" is useful to list hidden files. If you find the "powerpoint temp" there then you can write
cp /.Trashes/(the exact name of the file: use tab after having just put the first letter to let terminal finish for you) Desktop

Other places where the missing autosave can be are (look inside the different folders):
ls -al /private/tmp/
ls -al /var/tmp/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

___Quote from http://forum.soft32.com/mac/MAC-store-autosave-files-ftopict87140.html

Good luck.

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MiniDevoCommented:
Also, have you set up the file location where autosave should have been saving? For instance, if you go into Word, you'll notice that the autosave feature location is blank, unless you have specified a location. Generally, this location is:
  ~:Documents:MIcrosoft User Data:Office 2008 AutoRecovery:
These files are hidden, and their file names starts with "~ar"
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kilr_vAuthor Commented:
I am using os x. With office 04' Manages to use sudo -s and become super user but cannot get into al/.Trashes/
Can you confirm exact lettering and spacing of command and suggest the next step. Each time it reads ' no such root file or directory'

Thanks
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kilr_vAuthor Commented:
I have found the temp files using library:Preferences:Microsoft:Microsoft:PowerPoint Temp - route. however out or the two files i need i can only open one. when i try to open the second one the message reads ' PowerPoint cannot read Macintosh HD:private:var:tmp:folders. 501:TemporaryItems:PowerPoint Temp 6 '

I have a presentation in the morning and could use a solution

Thanks
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