User Account to be used with VMware Server Web Interface

I would like to know how can I add User in Linux so that user account can login in VMware Server Web Interface? I'm using CentOS 5.2 and I have try to add user account. But the problem is when I use that User account to login to VMware Server Web Interface or VMware Server Console, the user I add can see all VPS on that server. And I don't want that to be happen. The user I add can only see his or her VPS, not others VPS.

Can anyone help?
MakassarNETAsked:
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65tdRetiredCommented:
From the VMWare Infrastructure Web Access console from the menu bar at the top left select administration and create new role for that user.
Need to decide how much control they require, etc.

Then go to the vm and select the Permissions tab and add a new permission using the new role, note the check box at the bottom of the New Permission box.
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TolomirAdministratorCommented:
Are you talking about vmware 1.0.8 server?

Or do you already use the new (also free) vmware 2.0 server?

vmware 2.0 is closely related to vmware esx server (VI client). You can only define roles there. users and groups are handled by the operation system on the host.

Permissions are handled via the permission tab (either globally by groups or for each client host for each user / group):

Creating Permissions
You can assign system or user-defined roles to users or groups on VMware Server inventory objects. In VMware Server, the only inventory objects are the host and individual virtual machines.

To create a permission
1  Log in to VI Web Access as a user with Administrator privileges.

2  Select a host or virtual machine from the Inventory panel, and click the Permissions tab.

3  Click New Permission in the Commands section.

4  Select the user or group to which you want to grant a role on this object.  
When you have a large number of users and groups, only some of them are displayed. To find specific users or groups, enter a search value in the Quick Find text box.

5  Select a role you want to grant from the drop-down list.  
When a role is selected, the privileges associated with the role are listed in the tree below for your reference.

6  (Optional) If you want to apply the permission to all child objects of the selected inventory object, select Grant this set of permissions to child objects.

7  Click OK.

The permission is added to the list of permissions for the object. The list of permissions includes all users and groups that have roles assigned to the object, and indicates the level at which the permission is defined.


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MakassarNETAuthor Commented:
I'm currently using version 1.0.7. I don't see this kind of option on the VMware Server 1.0.7.


Sincerely,

Hernan Halim
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MakassarNETAuthor Commented:
I have upgraded to VMware Server 1.0.8. But I don't see this option to add user to VPS.


Sincerely,

Hernan Halim
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TolomirAdministratorCommented:
We are talking about vmware server 2.0

Not 1.x

Check features here: http://www.vmware.com/products/server/features.html
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MakassarNETAuthor Commented:
Does the VMware Server 2.0 is stable? Cause I read some post in Forums mentioned that there is still lots of bugs in VMware Server 2.0. That's why I'm still using 1.0.x version.


Sincerely,

Hernan Halim
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65tdRetiredCommented:
Version in windows seems to be working fine for my use.
Could you permission the the virtual (vmdk) file so the user has no access?
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TolomirAdministratorCommented:
Same here - vmware server 2.0 under windows - no problem.
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MakassarNETAuthor Commented:
Chmod the other VM (vmdk) file is not helping at all cause I have try this as well.

But I found out one thing about this issue which solved my problems. Please note that this is Linux version so I do this in Linux way.

1. Create a VPS call VPS-A from VMware Server Console with root privileges.
2. Create a new username, let's call it VPS-A users.
3. Login to VPS-A with VMware Server Console using username VPS-A as well to login.
4. Check the permission of the VPS to be PRIVATE. This can be done under VM Tab in VMware Server Console, and choose Settings (or you can do this by pressing "Control + D"). When VPS Settings is open, go to Option Tab and choose Permissions. Than all you have to do is check the box mentioned "Make this virtual machine private".

By doing this, only user VPS-A and root (Administrator) who can access or open the VPS from the Vmware Server Console or from VMware Management Web Interface. You should also doing the same thing with all others VPS in your VMware Server.


Sincerely,

Hernan Halim
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TolomirAdministratorCommented:
Yes, right, I never did use that feature so I forgot,  but that is the solution in vmware 1.x
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