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passwordless but secure auth, unencrypted traffic

Currently I have configured ssh passless remote access for file copying. It works but has this flow, that de/crypting traffic costs cpu power and network bandwidth.

So are there any other options to have secure remote auth(key based), but clear-text transfer?

I'm on CentoOS 5 and FC.
I know there's ssh "cipher none" patch - but i'm not after patching ssh which comes with the OS.
Any other ideas?
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ravenpl
Asked:
ravenpl
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3 Solutions
 
KeNt_UACommented:
NFSv3 + iptables = no keys
NFSv4 ?
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ravenplAuthor Commented:
iptables is not the replacement for ssh keys, if it was, then rsh would be the really fine solution here.
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KeNt_UACommented:
keys = encryption
open rsh or nfs only for one ip and no other
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ravenplAuthor Commented:
> keys = encryption
No. keys mean authentication, not necessarily encryption.

> open rsh or nfs only for one ip and no other
what about other users on same machines?
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KeNt_UACommented:
NFS configures for users
man exports
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ravenplAuthor Commented:
From the question
"So are there any other options to have secure remote auth(key based), but clear-text transfer?"
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cjl7Commented:
Kerberos + ftp
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TintinCommented:
Kerberos FTP would have been my suggestion as well.
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ravenplAuthor Commented:
May I ask how it works? I never set up any krb server.
What is the authentication token while authenticating? With ssh it's the pub/priv keypair.

Still I would prefer something like ssh/rsh, since the copied data is duplicated into two localtions.
Currently I have something like
tar -options | ssh -options remote_command # where remote_command is more less "tea /1/file1 | cat > /2/file2"
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TintinCommented:
Kerberos works on the basis of tickets.  Tickets usually have an expiration time on them, so they are valid for whatever period you set them for.

Additionally, kerberos can also handle the encryption for you if you want (I know in your case, you don't want it)

See http://www.linuxtopia.org/online_books/centos_linux_guides/centos_linux_reference_guide/s1-kerberos-clients.html
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macker-Commented:
rsh is the predecessor to ssh, and provides the same functionality; running commands on a remote server, but in an "insecure" manner.  (rsh = remote shell, ssh = secure shell.)  For the current method you're using, rsh would be appropriate.

If you prefer to use ftp, there's many clients that allow you to insert a password automatically.  I'm biased towards the ncftp tools ncftpget and ncftpput, which allow batch mode operation, however even the command-line ftp client supports auto-login (`man 5 netrc`).

It's unclear whether you are specifically looking for a public/private key authentication mechanism, or simply want automated file transfer that's unencrypted, but uses some sort of authentication (be it password or public/private keys).

Kerberos is a heavy-handed solution to the problem, and isnt really offering a strong solution.  Kerberos is meant to provide a single sign-on solution, where you use your password for the initial authentication, and then use the "ticket" provided as a token.  You might use a secure method to obtain the ticket (a unique token, proving you've authenticated), and then insecure methods to transfer the ticket.

Within the vein of Kerberos, a more appropriate solution might be something like S/Key authentication; you pre-generate a number of pass-phrases, that are one-time-use.  But again, it doesn't sound like that's what you want.

It sounds like what you want is the ability to transfer data between two servers, in the clear, in a readily automated fashion, but where someone must have a credential of some type (which is probably stored in a script) to do so; e.g. another non-root user on the source server cannot just copy the files over.

NFS, FTP or RSH would be good solutions, assuming the above is true.  NFS provides an IP-based ACL, and the permissions are limited based on source UID; unless someone has root on the source system, they can't get to the data.  RSH allows you a similar method to what you're using now, but a pass-phrase instead of a DSA/RSA key, and non-encrypted.  FTP is built for file transfer, but wont operate in a streaming mode, as you're doing; it can be automated.

Lastly, you could also use other non-preferred methods, such as an HTTP-based script, TFTP (password-less, Trivial FTP), netcat, etc.
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TintinCommented:
How much data are you trying to transfer and what so of link do you have?
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ravenplAuthor Commented:
> How much data are you trying to transfer and what so of link do you have?
0.5 TB via 1gbit eth.

Thanx guys for Your opinions.
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