Blue Screen (BSOD)

Posted on 2008-11-19
Last Modified: 2012-05-05
I get the following error on occasion.

Page Fault In Nonpaged Area
Stop: 0x00000050 (0xE6176000, 0X0000000, 0X8A59D3DE, 0X00000001)

When the pc laptop boots back up, it takes me to a Microsoft page that talks about Dell Driver Reset.  This does not seem to help me at all.

Any suggestions?
Question by:kman48185
    LVL 7

    Expert Comment

    These are some of the cause for BSOD(Blue screen of death or Memory dump)
    •  Older or poorly written software. You might be using a program which simply doesnt work very well under the Windows version you use, for example. Alternatively, you may be using a program for which a patch has been released to correct a particular problem, and youve not yet installed the patch. If its an older, unsuitable program then getting rid of it would be the way to go. If a more current and suitable program seems to be involved, then the best course of action is often to uninstall it, reboot, and then reinstall the program making sure that all available updates are also installed. Remember that Windows itself is a program of sorts. If it has suffered any damage then you may need to do a repair or a refresh install to correct it.
    • RAM mismatch. If your system has more than one RAM module installed, and they arent identical, they just may not be getting along together very well. Thats rather easy to determine. Use one module at a time, in memory slot 1, and see if the problem goes away! If it does you know that your RAM was at fault. Matched modules  same brand, same model  are always best! (You could also run Memtest  to check your system in case its a failing RAM module or memory controller, rather than a mismatch.)
    • Cheap power supply unit. The power supplies contained in many cheaper units can, under some circumstances, lead to problems because the voltage levels they deliver fluctuate far too much. Thats not so easy to determine, but if the activity on your system when you experience problems involves the use of power-hungry devices then the power unit becomes a likely suspect.
    • Device drivers. Driver corruption causes lots of problems for lots of people. The device drivers installed for your hardware components should be up to date and obtained from the manufacturer. Previous drivers should be uninstalled before newer ones are installed. Major changes to hardware should be accompanied with a format/fresh install, rather than made with a simple installation of new device drivers.
    • Drive corruption. Just as our CDs and DVD's can physically suffer from the ravages of time and use, so can our hard drives. The diagnostic tools available for download on the manufacturers website should soon indicate whether or not your drive has suffered. Alternatively, if a file on your hard drive has suffered corruption related to other causes, that file needs to be replaced.
    • Unwanted intruders. Every system should be regularly and thoroughly scanned for malware, and any instance of malware detected should be removed. Ensuring that the system is free of such intruders is an extremely important part of any trouble-shooting.
    • System corruption. As mentioned above, the Windows installation can, and does, suffer damage. Repairing or refreshing could well resolve that problem.
    • Overheating. If the insides are clogged up with dust and gunk all sorts of nasty things can begin to happen. They should be kept clean, and that wont happen.

    Is yours Athlon processor? Try dropping  the memory speed in BIOS from 100% to 80% on your  motherboard.
    LVL 3

    Accepted Solution

    To resolve this problem, start your computer in Safe mode, remove the display adapter, rename the .inf files that are associated with the display adapter drivers, restart your computer in Normal mode, and then update your display adapter drivers. The following steps describe this procedure in more detail:
    Start Windows in Safe mode. To do so:
    Restart the computer, and then press F8 while the computer starts.
    On the Windows Advanced Options Menu that appears, use the ARROW keys to select Safe Mode, and then press ENTER.
    Use the ARROW keys to select the operating system to start, and then press ENTER to start Windows XP in Safe mode.
    In the message that states that Windows is running in Safe mode, click Yes.
    Click Start, click Run, type msinfo32 in the Open box, and then click OK.
    Under System Summary, expand Components, and then click Display.
    In the right pane, note the information that corresponds to the INF File item, for example, Nv4.inf, Oem0.inf, or Atim128.inf.
    Quit the System Information utility.
    Click Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.
    Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
    Expand Display adapters, right-click the display adapter, and then click Uninstall.
    Click OK.
    Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.
    In the Command Prompt window, type the following commands, and then press ENTER after each line:
    ren %systemroot%\inf\INF file name from Step 5.inf *inf.old
    ren %systemroot%\inf\INF file name from Step 5.pnf *pnf.old
    Close all open windows, and then restart the computer in the typical manner.
    Log on to Windows by using an account that has administrative privileges, and then wait for Windows to detect new hardware.
    When the Found New Hardware Wizard starts, click Cancel.

    If you receive a stop error after you remove the updated display drivers, restart the computer and use the Last Known Good Configuration option. To do this, restart the computer, and then press the F8 key while the computer starts. On the Windows Advanced Options Menu that appears, use the ARROW keys to select Last Known Good Configuration, and then press ENTER.

    If you receive a "System Has Recovered from a Serious Error" message when Windows starts, restart the computer again. This error message does not recur.
    Obtain and install the latest drivers for your display adapter.For information about how to

    Hope this will help
    LVL 2

    Expert Comment

    Weel first of all, when did start the errors.
    What have you done or install to start appering those errors?
    What is the model and S.O. on the laptop?

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