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how do I manually delete restore points?

Posted on 2009-02-09
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I have looked through the knowledge base, but cannot find any answer for my problem and I was wondering if anyone can help me manually delete a restore point?  I have a restore point which appears for an old harddrive I no longer have.

Thanks so much,
Phil
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Question by:rotnfire
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by:Lukasz Chmielewski
ID: 23614574
rclick on my computer, restoring points (?), turn off restoring points for all disks

check this article for more
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/301224
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by:rotnfire
ID: 23616754
As I mentioned, this is a restore point for a disk that I do not have any longer, but used to have.
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by:Lukasz Chmielewski
ID: 23616909
so where does this appear ?
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Author Comment

by:rotnfire
ID: 23619431
in the DOS window when I list the restore points (vssadmin list shadowstorage).  The allocated space for that storage drive (which doesn't exist) is 140GB, and the size of the restore point is 2GB.  I assume it won't be growing any larger, but am wondering how to remove any allocated space, and delete the restore point.
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rotnfire earned 0 total points
ID: 23619448
Actually, my last comment got me to thinking.  I manually resized my restore point allocation on the drive which doesn't exist any longer, to be the minimum allowed of 300mb.  Since that size was lower the the amount of the item, which was 2GB, it deleted the storage point.  Strange how I could do that, even though the drive doesn't exist any longer.

The issue is that it did exist on the image I used to restore my primary drive, and that is where I believe the information is coming from.
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by:rotnfire
ID: 23619642
I cannot remove the entry for the allocated space, but I did remove the restore point.  I suppose the restore point must have been maintained on my primary drive.  Once deleted, my primary drive increased available space by 2GB.  As well, seems some primary table maintains information on the allocated space for system restore?  I suppose once the feature was turned on, and information was written to the primary table, it cannot be erased.  Probably there because I restored from an Acronis image of my primary drive, which contained the information on my previous drive.  Of course, if I actually ran system restore, that restore point didn't show, since it wasn't for my primary drive in the first place.
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