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Secure Sockets for embedded Linux

I need to implement SSL in my embedded Linux box running NetOS. Can anyone point me in the right direction.

Free or cheap is good. Must be licensed to that it can be used in a commercial application.
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Chipkin_com
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Chipkin_com
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AdamsConsultingCommented:
I have never done any embedded development, but I do understand the concept. Can you not use OpenSSL? If you're using if for HTTPS, what daemon or client do you need to add SSL capabilities to?
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Chipkin_comAuthor Commented:
I am writing the client. I need the https service to log into a server,
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AdamsConsultingCommented:
I think the openssl libraries are your thing then.

http://www.openssl.org/docs/ssl/ssl.html

I'm confused on what you mean by the https service has to log into a server, though. I would expect an HTTPS client to do the logging in. If the "service" is already written and you just need to at SSL capabilities to your protocol you may consider just implementing stunnel with OpenSSL.

http://www.stunnel.org/
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reswobslcCommented:
Here is a helpful example that I was able to verify makes a functioning SSL connection using openssl:

http://www.len.ro/2007/06/openssl-example/

(You might have to fix the text - including one closing brace that is inadvertently commented out due to the weird formatting).

Statically linking OpenSSL will easily add 1MB+ to the size of your executable, and alternately, linking to the libraries will take a few extra MB.  If you don't have that to spare, consider MatrixSSL (google it), an SSL implementation meant for embedded Linux devices that comes in two flavors - free (GNU) and commercial paid.  Not sure what the price of the paid version is, but they claim to only need something in the neighborhood of 100 KB depending on your needs and platform.
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