How can I configure an Outlook 2007 profile on a non domain member computer to connect to Exchange 2003 mailbox

Hello, I have a couple of vista laptops with outlook 2007 that need to connect to a exchange 2003 mailboxes. The trouble is the laptops are non domain members, and need to connect in the field as well as on the LAN. Of course POP is not an option as the dns name of the server will not resolve inside the LAN. The DHCP server is a verizon FIOS router and has limited programable functionality. If I were to say use a host file I would run into the same problem.  
mmenteleAsked:
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MesthaCommented:
RPC over HTTPS is the only solution I would be looking at here.
It was basically designed for non-domain members to connect, as it was designed for the hosted Exchange users.

Lots of articles to set it up.
http://www.amset.info/exchange/rpc-http.asp

However the problem you have identified with the POP3 server not working inside the LAN will apply here as well. You will need to setup a split DNS system so that the external name resolves internally. http://www.amset.info/netadmin/split-dns.asp

-M
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frostburnCommented:
Hi there,

I had a similar situation. Had several laptops that needed to access the exchange server. I logged on locally with user accounts. They connected with wireless cards.

Then added entries in the hosts file for the DNS and Exchange servers and whatever other servers you need to access.
The laptops will likely get a different IP address range and routing tables on servers they need access to might also need entries to accommodate for that.
Then I just configured the outlook with the exchange server info and it pops up with a username password box when outlook is opened.
The users will then type in their domain usernames and passwords when opening outlook and presto!

It can get a tad complicated though.:)
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mmenteleAuthor Commented:
dns resolution is coming from the FIOS router though, if I were to put a modified host file on the laptops I would not be able to connect when the laptop is off my LAN right? The ip scope is standard 192.168.1.X and I cant change that as the FIOS TVS take an ip, because the scope is so standard they would have troubles on another WLAN
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mmenteleAuthor Commented:
I have been poking around on the topic of rpc over http, will that work?
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frostburnCommented:
Well the entries you put in the host files are just the names and addresses of your servers.
So the laptops would still work on the LAN regardless. They will just be using the host file to find the exchange server instead of querying the dns server.

You can also use the OWA (Outlook Web Access) instead if you like. That actually tends to work a little faster because there is not as much authentication that has to go back and forth as with the outlook.

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MesthaCommented:
Hosts files have no place in a network environment. Everything should be done by DNS. They are hidden away and people forget about them.

Furthermore how would that help with name resolution depending on location? If the machine was static then they would work, but if the user leaves the office, what IP address are you going to put in? The internal one or the external?

-M
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mmenteleAuthor Commented:
yeah host file is less than ideal. I canot implement split dns as the router has limited functionality. It also must be DHCP server as it provides ip addys to set top DTV boxes.  

Reluctantly I am leaning to VPN and domain member machines....
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frostburnCommented:
Well if you have OWA configured then that would be a good option to use.
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MesthaCommented:
The fact that you are providing IP addresses to set top boxes doesn't stop you from moving DHCP to the Windows server. You just need to establish what subnet it is issuing and then disable DHCP in the router. If it is 192.168.x.x then it doesn't matter at all.

-M
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