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How many quad core processors will Windows Server 2003 Standard x32 support

I would like to configure a server with 2 Quad core processors. using Win 2003, and will Win 2008 be able to support more.
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dpconsulting
Asked:
dpconsulting
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2 Solutions
 
Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
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Michael WorshamInfrastructure / Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Another article/blog post...

Which OS for the 64bit Dual Core?
http://blogs.technet.com/labrat/archive/2005/12/14/which-os-for-the-64bit-dual-core.aspx
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PCBONEZCommented:
Each Core is a Processor so 1 Dual core = 2 CPUs, and 1 Quad core = 4 CPUs.

Win 2003 Small Business Edition: 2 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Web Edition: 2 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Standard Edition: 4 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Data Center Edition: 8 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Enterprise Edition: 32-bit 32 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Enterprise Edition: 64-bit 64 CPUs [or Cores]

Win 2008 is similar but requires 64-bit architecture processors.

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CallandorCommented:
Microsoft licenses are on a per socket basis, not core - see leew's response http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Servers/Q_23901116.html.  Server licensing can be seen here: http://www.directionsonmicrosoft.com/sample/DOMIS/update/2008/10oct/1008lws.htm
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CallandorCommented:
The official Microsoft licensing for multicore and hyperthreaded cpus: http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/resources/volbrief.mspx
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PCBONEZCommented:
Now if you'll read ALL of it:
"""" Note that while this brief identifies certain software products and versions that run on multicore and hyperthreaded processors, it does not address their ability to fully use those technologies. """"

Get that:
>> it does not address their ability to use those technologies. <<

Your link covers license requirements, which is per socket.
That's not how the Software [OS] counts or works with CPU's, that's per core.

Leew was discussing license requirements too.

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CallandorCommented:
PCBONEZ,

Anything to confirm that's how OS'es count?  I would imagine a lot of corporations would be pissed off at paying for a licence and not being able to use it as they legally could.  Leew was discussing whether it would support another socket:

"What would happen if I later decided to add a second Quad-Core to the system? Would I need to upgrade to Enterprise Server 32-Bit or 64-Bit?
No, again, Microsoft licenses per SOCKET and Server Standard I BELIEVE supports 4 Sockets.  The number of Cores is unimportant for these purposes."

Now he may be speculating, but if you know otherwise, I'd be grateful for the correction.
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PCBONEZCommented:
If those Corporations haven't fired Microsoft BY NOW then they aren't all that concerned with expenses.

....

My numbers are off but the concept isn't.
The License-CPU/Socket dependency is all marketing and has nothing to do with how many cores the OS actually supports.


>>> Anything to confirm that's how OS'es count? <<<

Yes it's called Symmetric Multi-Processing [SMP]

In case of multi-core processors SMP treats each core as a separate processor.

If the OS supports 2-Way SMP it can only use 2 cores.
If the OS supports 4-Way SMP it can only use 4 cores.
If the OS supports 8-Way SMP it can only use 8 cores.
And so on....

More cores could be there but the OS can't run threads to them and they will be idle.

......

Example:
Win 2003 Web Edition can be licensed for 2 CPUs
- Highest supported SMP is 2-way.
You could put in a single Quad core or a pair of Dual cores but 2-way SMP only enables the OS to use 2 cores.

...

Go here:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc758523.aspx
Data Center Edition 32-bit: - 32 way SMP
Data Center Edition 64-bit: - 64 way SMP

Now go here and see notes at the bottom.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/compare-specs.aspx
x86 32-bit Data Center License allows 32 Sockets. Note says max of 32 cores.
x64 64-bit Data Center License allows 64 Sockets. Note says max of 64 cores.

Isn't it interesting how the: # way SMP = Max # cores = # Sockets.
If # cores = # sockets then obviously they are all single core CPUs.

Data Center Edition 32-bit: - 32 way SMP
Data Center Edition 64-bit: - 64 way SMP
Enterprise Edition 32-bit: - 8 way SMP
Enterprise Edition 64-bit: - 8 way SMP
Standard Edition - 4 way SMP
Web Edition - 2 way SMP

...
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CallandorCommented:
I saw those links.  It seems to me that the earlier document for Server 2003 (which was written in 2003) predated the advent of multicore cpus.  Note that the Server 2008 document actually specifies 4 x86 sockets (I understand this to mean physical cpu chips) and the footnote says up to 32 cores.  That means if an eight-core cpu came out, this would support up to four of them in a system.  I think Microsoft hasn't updated their old web page for Server 2003, because the Server 2008 is very explicit, but it wouldn't be the first time this happened.  The SMP designation was written in the days of single core CPUs and doesn't mean sockets anymore.  Of course, you may interpret it differently, but I believe this would put it in line with their license definitions.
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PCBONEZCommented:
>> The SMP designation was written in the days of single core CPUs and doesn't mean sockets anymore.
Exactly, it means cores. It always did, but sockets used to only have one core.

The document that gives the same number of sockets as cores is the newer.
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/compare-specs.aspx
That's where it gives the [# cores = # sockets] limits information.

A member of another forum actually called Microsoft Tech Support to get a straight answer and you know what:
Microsoft Tech Support didn't know either.

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CallandorCommented:
That's the one that says 4 sockets and 32 cores in the footnote for Server 2008 Standard.  How are you getting cores = sockets from it?
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PCBONEZCommented:
Wrong page. Thread is Win2003.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc758523.aspx
Server 2003 Standard -> 4-way SMP.
SMP is how many ->cores<- the OS can support/operate/use.
SMP doesn't care what the License says, it's a real world limit.

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CallandorCommented:
Updated: March 28, 2003

That page was written before the advent of multiple cores.  It could just as well have said physical cpu chips instead of cores.  Why are you insisting that that one is right and the 2008 version is wrong?  I don't see anything about licensing in the 2008 page.  I think I am going to have to disagree with you on this, because the evidence points the other way, and this is not telling me anything different.
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PCBONEZCommented:
The OS was written before the advent of multiple cores.
Is it your contention that the fact they changed the licensing agreement changed the code in the OS?

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PCBONEZCommented:
This is what I said,, what I've been talking about,, and what you say you are in disagreement with.
- Yes?

Win 2003 Small Business Edition: 2 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Web Edition: 2 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Standard Edition: 4 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Data Center Edition: 8 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Enterprise Edition: 32-bit 32 CPUs [or Cores]
Win 2003 Enterprise Edition: 64-bit 64 CPUs [or Cores]

That's all it could be because as I just told you the link to 2008 version was an error.
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CallandorCommented:
No, it is my contention that the 2008 document reflects the state of the world as they know it now.  32 cores, 4 sockets for Standard.  Now, it is possible that 2003 behaves differently than 2008 in this regard.  But the marketing people should be making a big deal of it if it changed that dramatically.  So I think that it didn't change, but I don't know that for a fact.
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PCBONEZCommented:
Callandor the biggest problem is I was talking about 2003 and you about 2008.
Not on same page. No worries.
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