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Windows Vista Blue Screen crash

I have just upgraded a Windows XP SP-3 system to Vista Business SP-1. The system has a Pentium 4 CPU @ 3.4 GHz and 2048 MB of DDRAM.   When Windows loads, there is a STOP error code 0x0000008E.  This blue screen appears right after the last setup screen says "Please wait while Windows checks your computer's performance."

Before upgrading, the compatibility test did not indicate any fatal problems.  The upgrade appeared to progress normally until the very end.  I have tried Safe Mode, but there is a message that Setup cannot complete Windows installation in Safe Mode.  

I tried several other DDRAM, although the ones I am using have not shown errors on MemTest. the same result occurred.  I disonncected all peripheral hardware except the mouse, keyboard and monitor, and removed all PCI expansion cards, leaving only the AGP card.

To access the latest dump and minidump files, and a recent Dr. Watson dump file, please visit www.mauitradewinds.com/Dump   The main dumpfile is large, around 130 MB.

Thanks for any help!
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ddantes
Asked:
ddantes
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1 Solution
 
John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
From http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm

A kernel mode program generated an exception which the error handler didnt catch. These are nearly always hardware compatibility issues (which sometimes means a driver issue or a need for a BIOS upgrade).

Given the inability to use Safe Mode, there is probably a basic driver incompatability: CPU chipset driver, NIC driver, or Video driver are ones that come to mind.

I put the wrong image to a particular machine, and it was the CPU chipset driver that stopped me cold.
.... T

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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your comment.  I will see if the motherboard manufacturer has a bios upgrade.  As far as the chipset driver, and other drivers, if I cannot boot into Vista, how would I replace the suspect drivers?
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
My comment arose from trying to reimage an IBM (Lenovo) Desktop. I went to the support site but they did not have the driver for the version of OS I was trying to load (my error, not theirs). So I would suggest seeing if the vendor has any "core chipset" or "video chipset" drivers in its support site. ... T
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Thank you for those details.  I found a Vista driver for the AGP graphics card, but the bios and other motherboard drivers most recent releases are over three years old, and not specified compatible with Vista.  Again, before the upgrade, the compatability advisor did not find any devices or drivers which required uninstallation before proceeding with the update.

This computer has dual O.S. -- an operable Windows XP SP-3 and an inoperable Vista Business SP-1.

Regarding the AGP driver, I don't know how to install it when I can't boot into Vista.  It is an executable file which extracts other files to a chosen directory and then proceeds immediately with installation.  I am hesitant to try to extract the files while runnng Windows XP.because I don't want to install a Vista driver under that O.S.
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nobusCommented:
DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  COMMON_SYSTEM_FAULT
PROCESS_NAME:  svchost.exe  IMAGE_NAME:  Unknown_Image

info from the dmp :
KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED_M (1000008e)
This is a very common bugcheck.  Usually the exception address pinpoints
the driver/function that caused the problem.  Always note this address
as well as the link date of the driver/image that contains this address.
Some common problems are exception code 0x80000003.  This means a hard
coded breakpoint or assertion was hit, but this system was booted
/NODEBUG.  This is not supposed to happen as developers should never have
hardcoded breakpoints in retail code, but ...
If this happens, make sure a debugger gets connected, and the
system is booted /DEBUG.  This will let us see why this breakpoint is
happening.
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Dear Nobus:  Thank you for your comment.  Unfortunately my computer knowledge is limited.  I think you want me to make some adjustment to the system so that it boots with a debug function.  If this is the case I will need specific instructions as to how to make that adjustment.  Thanks.
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nobusCommented:
no i don't want you to do anything - i just gave you the info from the dump
maybe your problems come from the fact you have a dual OS
you can always try a repair install : http://vistasupport.mvps.org/windows_vista_repair_options.htm
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
My mistake.  I thought a function needed to be switched from /nodebug to /debug in order for the dumpfile to contain specific information about the problem driver or device.

I don't have a Vista installation disk.  I downloaded this version from the Micforsoft store.

Any other options?
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Dear Nobus:  Thank you for that link.  I burned a Windows Vista Repair disk and booted from it.  The Repair My Computer function reported "no problem found" and the memory test reported no problem.
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nobusCommented:
and is it ok now ?
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Sorry I left that open to guesswork.  The same blue screen crash occurs after attemting Repair My Computer.  I have disabled all services and startup programs in Safe Mode.  It still STOPs.  However, I tried a clean install and it works.  This tells me there probably isn't a hardware coflict -- would you please comment on this?
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nobusCommented:
if the clean install is OK, it must have been a software corruption, OS or drivers
Do you have further Q's ?
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Yes.  Is there a systematic way to isolate the problem?
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nobusCommented:
you mean that you won't have that problem ?
i must say there is no foolproof system i know; what i do is turning of all automatic updates, to leave the system as it is, when it is running.
you can also make an image of it, when everything is installed and ok - if you have problems, it is only 10 minutes and you are back where you were
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
My Windows XP SP-3 was highly customized and loaded with software.  I would like to avoid going through the work of re-establishing all that in the Vista clean install.  That is why I tried to upgrade.  Since the Vista clean install works, there must be a software conflict rather than hardware.  I am thinking there is a way of analyzing a dump file or debugging report which would show which driver or which application caused the fault.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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nobusCommented:
>>  I would like to avoid going through the work of re-establishing all that in the Vista clean install.     <<   most people want not to do much work on it, i understand that.
however, you take all problems on the old install with you to the new install.
That is why i never do an upgrade.  it's more work now, , but you get better results later.
are all dumps the same ? or do you get only one. ?
i added the complete analysis, note the :  ANALYSIS_INCONCLUSIVE  part  this tells you it can't define what exactly is bad
do you have the drwatson's log file?  you can analyse it like shown here : http://seer.support.veritas.com/docs/191218.htm
dump.txt
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ddantesAuthor Commented:
Nobus:  Thank you for your insights.  I worked out a compromise between starting over with a clean install and an upgrade.  By trial and error, using the functioning second (winXP) O.S., I substituted segments of the registry files from the clean install into the upgrade until it boots.  There is some configuration to do, but the main functionality I sought is working.
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nobusCommented:
tx for the feedback
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