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ipv6 Windows 2008 DHCP

Posted on 2009-02-23
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I am setting up lab with 2008 test server with an xp client, I am setting up the server to act as a DHCP server, I have enetered the ipv4 range, it also requires an ipv6 range. Without reading through tonnes of articles can someone give me a brief lowdown on ipv6.

For instance what is the equivalant of 192.168.0.1  in an ipv6 format, what addresses should I be using for a small lan if I am using ipv6
Thanks
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Question by:Sid_F
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by:tigermatt
ID: 23715325
For a small LAN I probably wouldn't bother implementing IPv6. You're best staying on IPv4 and keeping it that way, since, for now anyway, everything will inter-operate properly at IPv4.

You shouldn't need to enter an IPv6 range when configuring a DHCP Server in Server 2008. None of my Server 2008 DHCP Servers have any IPv6 ranges installed.

-Matt
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by:Sid_F
ID: 23716753
Ok so when should IPv6 be implemented? if an application needed ipv6 on a lan what addresses should be used, lets say I had two vista machines and I wanted to configure them to communicate over ipv6, what address do I give them , how do they get across the gateway etc
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by:jfields71
ID: 23722208
Most likely they are already on the same IPv6 network:
http://www.syschat.com/ipv6-tutorial-a-comprehensive-guide-4254.html
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jamaicanbishop earned 2000 total points
ID: 23925750
This site will give you the information you need.  IPv6 can be used on any network, but the complexity is not needed or warranted in a smaller network.

What is IPv6?
IPv6 is the next generation of the internet protocol. When IPv4 (the current standard developped in 1981) came out, they figured that an estimated 4.294 billion addresses would be enough. It turns out that this internet thing really caught on and there's actually a shortage of IP addresses. To remedy this situation, there have been many proposed solutions, but the one that has really caught on with the techs around the world is IPv6. For someone who doesn't know all that much about networking or computers, the world of IP can be a scary confusing place. This web site's aim is to include limited technical information, but include many step-by-step HOWTOs to set up IPv6 on your computer and network.
Why not just use Network Address Translation (NAT)?
NAT is a fantastic temporary solution, but that is all it really is. The internet is designed so that computers can communicate directly to each other around the world. In due time there will be no extra IP addresses and we will be forced to move to IPv6 as the internet protocol. Until that time, computers will be huddled in their own private networks behind NAT servers and gateways. The down side of this is that your computer, rather than having complete, unlimited access, incoming and outgoing to the internet, is being blocked by it's gateway to the internet.

At the present time (Summer 2003) the small office / home office (SOHO) router makers (LinkSys, D-Link and Netgear) are not using IPv6. Eventually they will be forced to. At that time, you'll either be able to upgrade the firmware on your router if they're nice, or you'll have to buy a new router. If you want to start to play with IPv6 and you don't have an public IP address (that is to say, you are stuck behind a NAT gateway or proxy) you will have to use a very newer access method called teredo.

IPv6 prefix lengths
IPv6 prefix lengths are comparable to the subnets of IPv4, they are much bigger though because IPv6 is based on a completely different address structure. A /64 is the address length in the form of:

ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:0000:0000:0000:0000

where the last part of the address will usually look something like:

ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:0200:00ff:fe00:0000

and would be filled in with the MAC address of the network card. For example, a MAC Address of 00:08:DB:EF:34:33 would result in an IPv6 address like:

ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:0208:dbff:feef:3433

Each part of an IPV6 address with prepending 0s can be omitted, but still represent the same address. The following are some examples...

ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:0208:dbff:feef:3433
shown as:
ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:208:dbff:feef:3433

ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:0000:0000:00a0:feb5
shown as:
ffff:ffff:Ffff:ffff::a0:feb5

A /64 contains 2^64 nodes or 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 IPv6 addresses. That's 18.446 quintillion for those of you who need to call it something. A /48 contains 65,535 /64s. So the since the current spec for IPv6 gives you a /64 for being able to breathe.

This means that a /48 contains 1,208,907,372,870,555,465,154,560 IPv6 address, which is 1.208 octillion addreses.

Approximate Number of IPv6 Addresses Size Easier to Say Mask
18,446,744,073,709,551,616 /64 18.466 quintillion ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff::
1,208,907,372,870,555,465,154,560 /48 1.208 octillion  ffff:ffff:ffff::
79,225,744,681,071,852,408,904,089,600 /32 79.225 nonillion  ffff:ffff::
5,192,059,177,674,043,847,617,529,511,936,000 /16 5.192 undecillion ffff::


Getting an IPv6 Address
So you want to get an IPv6 address today, there's a few ways to do it. The first one, and the best one is if your Internet Service Provider (ISP) supplies them to you. This is great, because all you have to do now is enable ipv6 on your computer and you're done.

Most of us don't have that luxury, fortunately there has been a lot of work in creating a tunneling protocol which allows you to get and use an IPv6 address over your IPv4 connection to the internet. There's a whole lot of documentation about this and how to use it, so I'd like to go over some of it with you. I've tried this stuff with Windows XP, FreeBSD 4.8 and RedHat Linux 7.3 so I can give you a little bit of what I ran into to get where I am today.



http://www.useipv6.com/
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by:simonains
ID: 24387337
Wow...
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