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How to Calculate Throughput

Hi,

How do i calculate throughput from read and write speed??? What is the relationship between them, I am trying to pick out a NAS box and throughput is listed as around 1100MBs, Read is down as 126MBs & Write as 111MBs.

How is all this calculated,

Thanks,

Stephen
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stevid
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stevid
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2 Solutions
 
techhealthCommented:
I don't believe there's any solid calculation there.  The advertised "read" and "write" might just be maximum burst speed, which doesn't really help you in determining the actual performance.  Throughput on a NAS box is a pretty murky term, and could mean different things to different context.  1100 MBps sounds like a fictional figure.  Think about it, 4 GBE interfaces combined couldn't even "throughput" that many bits.
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stevidAuthor Commented:
Yes that is very true but it has the graphs etc,

What do you think

http://www.qnap.com/pro_detail_feature.asp?p_id=109

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API_NOCCommented:
I believe this figure was calculated when you have both GigE ports active. The graph states calculated when 28 machines were accessing the NAS at the same time. So that means each pc was at about 39.28 MB each (1100/28) to me they should have been able to do about 71.42 MB each (2000/28) minus overhead at both ends of the wire.
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techhealthCommented:
OK so it's 1177 Mbit/s.  That's more like it.  That means it's able to saturate one GBE port, and then some.  Not too shabby.  It seems to be pretty good performance, provided the numbers are true.  My concern is more with the software though.  With so many services supported - FTP, HTTP, MySQL, and more - they better be quite stable.  If the system crashes/hangs often, the performance numbers aren't going to help you.  My sense is that it probably has a customized Linux kernel as the foundation, and allows loadable modules.  That kind of setting could be buggy if not done right.
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stevidAuthor Commented:
Fair enough, Good advice, I notice it also has a dual operating systems so if one fails the other will become active and restore the original, Is this a good thing or something to be concerned over???
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techhealthCommented:
Hard to tell.  Too little details given.  It depends on how it's designed and implemented.  It may or may not guard against any of the common O/S failure scenarios.  Possible questions to ask them about:
-is it automatic failover?
-do the two copies share the same configuration?
-are they stored on separate chips?
Different answers may have very different implications.
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