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Javascript countdown timer

Posted on 2009-03-29
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I'm trying to create a countdown timer in javascript for a web page.  Everything appears to be working correctly except for the seconds. I think it must be my calculation, but I don't know what else to try. Can  anyone see where I'm going wrong?
function calculate()

{

	//load dates

	var startDate = new Date()

	var endDate = new Date("May 19, 2009, 21:00:00")

	

	//load variable

	var secPerYear = 60*60*24*365;

	var secPerDay = 60*60*24;

	var secPerHour = 60*60;

	var secPerMin = 60;

	

	//seconds left right now

	var seconds = (endDate.getTime() - startDate.getTime()) / 1000

	

	//get years left value

	var years = Math.floor(seconds / secPerYear)

	

	//remove seconds from year

	seconds = seconds - (years * secPerYear)

	

	//get day value

	var days = Math.floor(seconds / secPerDay)

	

	//remove seconds from day

	seconds = seconds - (days * secPerDay)

	

	//get hours value

	var hours = Math.floor(seconds / secPerHour)

	

	//remove seconds from hours

	seconds = seconds - (hours * secPerHour)

	

	//get minutes

	var minutes = Math.floor(seconds / secPerMin)

	

	//remove seconds from minutes

	seconds = seconds - (seconds * secPerMin)

		

	seconds = (seconds / 1000);

	

		

	lblYears.innerHTML = years

	lblDays.innerHTML = days

	lblHours.innerHTML = hours

	lblMinutes.innerHTML = minutes

	lblSeconds.innerHTML = seconds

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Question by:98fatboyrider
3 Comments
 
LVL 31

Assisted Solution

by:Frosty555
Frosty555 earned 200 total points
ID: 24013712
Everything looks fairly sound, but I think your last line:

seconds = (seconds / 1000);

Isn't necessary. Your seconds are already in seconds, you shouldn't need to divide by 1000 again.
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LVL 15

Assisted Solution

by:fsze88
fsze88 earned 300 total points
ID: 24019503
you can try this, much more simplified
<script type="text/javascript">

        var startDate = new Date()
        var endDate = new Date("May 1, 2009, 22:50:00")
        var differentDate;
        differentDate = new  Date(endDate - startDate);
        document.write("differentDate.getSeconds() : " + differentDate.getSeconds() + "<br/>" );
        document.write("differentDate.getMinutes() : " + differentDate.getMinutes() + "<br/>" );      
        document.write("differentDate.getHours() : " + differentDate.getHours() + "<br/>" );      
        document.write("differentDate.getDate() : " + differentDate.getDate() + "<br/>" );      
        document.write("differentDate.getMonth() : " + (differentDate.getMonth()-1) + "<br/>" );      
        document.write("differentDate.getFullYear() : " + differentDate.getFullYear() + "<br/>" );      
</script>
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Accepted Solution

by:
98fatboyrider earned 0 total points
ID: 24068334
Turns out it was a calculation error at line 38. I should have been multiplying by minutes, not seconds. Once that was working, I rounded the result to trim the milliseconds. Thanks for the help.
function calculate()

{

	//load dates

	var startDate = new Date()

	var endDate = new Date("May 12, 2009, 21:00:00")

	

	//load variables

	var secPerYear = 60*60*24*365;

	var secPerDay = 60*60*24;

	var secPerHour = 60*60;

	var secPerMin = 60;

	

	//seconds left right now

	var seconds = (endDate.getTime() - startDate.getTime()) / 1000

	

	//get years left

	var years = Math.floor(seconds / secPerYear)

	

	//remove seconds from year

	seconds = seconds - (years * secPerYear)

	

	//get days

	var days = Math.floor(seconds / secPerDay)

	

	//remove seconds from day

	seconds = seconds - (days * secPerDay)

	

	//get hours value

	var hours = Math.floor(seconds / secPerHour)

	

	//remove seconds from hours

	seconds = seconds - (hours * secPerHour)

	

	//get minutes

	var minutes = Math.floor(seconds / secPerMin)

	

	//remove seconds from minutes

	seconds = seconds - (minutes * secPerMin)

	

	seconds = Math.round(seconds) -1

	

	lblYears.innerHTML = years

	lblDays.innerHTML = days

	lblHours.innerHTML = hours

	lblMinutes.innerHTML = minutes

	lblSeconds.innerHTML = seconds

}

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