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How can we allow our users to access "safely remove hardware" using group policy/windows server 2003?

Posted on 2009-03-30
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Our students are unable to use "safely remove hardware" function on our lab computers because of our group policy restrictions. Is there a way to keep the computers restricted but allow them to safely remove their flash drives?
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Question by:bwhorton
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by:cubeeq
cubeeq earned 800 total points
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what about "Eject and format removable media..." policy in gpmc.msc: Computer/Windows/Security/Local policy/Security settings - it's a proxy translation I have a cz edition here.
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bwhorton earned 0 total points
ID: 24188830
Thanks, but we are still looking for a working solution.
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