Solved

grep piping

Posted on 2009-03-30
2
318 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-06
#myScript.sh
cat cars.txt | egrep 'car1|car2'
   outputs: car1: 1a
                 car2: 1b
                 car1: 2d
                 car2: 2e

What I would like to accomplish is have an output like below using the minimal commands
1a with 1b
2d with 2e

Can I modify egrep output to match my format and do this all at once? Would you pipe to echo?

Before I do any manual processing I wanted to ensure there were no elegant unix ways of accomplishing this..


0
Comment
Question by:NewtonianB
2 Comments
 
LVL 48

Accepted Solution

by:
Tintin earned 500 total points
ID: 24026362
You description is confusing to me.

You can get the required output with:

egrep 'car1|car2' | cut -f2 -d: | paste -d' ' - - |sed "s/\(.*\) /\1 with /"
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:NewtonianB
ID: 31564705
thanks!
0

Featured Post

3 Use Cases for Connected Systems

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, testing some more, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
linux  centos   virtualization network quetion 6 81
Java core in Solaris 10 1 283
LastLogonTimeStamp Attribute 7 48
Write an app 10 70
Java performance on Solaris - Managing CPUs There are various resource controls in operating system which directly/indirectly influence the performance of application. one of the most important resource controls is "CPU".   In a multithreaded…
Every server (virtual or physical) needs a console: and the console can be provided through hardware directly connected, software for remote connections, local connections, through a KVM, etc. This document explains the different types of consol…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

810 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question