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  • Status: Solved
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run a file under Linux

Hi All,

I tried to run a file but without any success.
File name: cim_matbuch_neu.sh
Location: /usr2/stamm/start_app

I enter this: ./su -user_nsd -c "/usr2/stamm/start_app/cim_matbuch_neu.sh"
and received the error message ./su not found

My colleague told me to enter: su - user_nsd -c "/usr2/stamm/start_app/cim_matbuch_neu.sh "

He said that it will work that way but I don't understand how can it work without ./ (dot slash)?

I didn't try it because I won't mess up things here in the company.

Thanks,



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didier20
Asked:
didier20
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2 Solutions
 
Deepak KosarajuSr. Monitoring Architect - Nagios/Op5 SME - ConsultantCommented:
su is a command to switch user, and su - is used to give full root access control of the user which u r using after - option
so su [space] - [space]  -c
space i type above dosen't imply u need to type it but u need to use spacbar.
More on su command look hit man pages by command
man su
su - user_nsd -c "/usr2/stamm/start_app/cim_matbuch_neu.sh"

Open in new window

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Maciej SsysadminCommented:
./su means run su from current (./) directory.
While su is located in directory which is for sure in PATH directory, you may run it without specification directory (just "su").
If you want to specify directory, it should be something like this: /bin/su (or wherever your su is located - you may check this with "which su" command).
In linux/unix you have to specify full/relative path to binary/script unless such binary/script is located in directory which is specified in PATH variable (run "echo $PATH" to see what directories you have in your PATH variable).
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didier20Author Commented:
You say that this is OK:
su - user_nsd -c "/usr2/stamm/start_app/cim_matbuch_neu.sh"

I know that this is OK as well:
./folap
(dot slash folap)

But how do I know, if somebody tells me, run a file whether I should use ./ (dot slash) or not?
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Maciej SsysadminCommented:
You can use ./file only when file is in your current directory.
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Deepak KosarajuSr. Monitoring Architect - Nagios/Op5 SME - ConsultantCommented:
Added to oklit you can use ./ only when the file is in current directory and has execute permissions
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didier20Author Commented:
You mean in MY current directory not in THE directory I am currently ?

If I am in the directory /usr2/home/my username, I can use ./
If I am in the directory /usr2/home, I can't use ./
Is that right?
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Deepak KosarajuSr. Monitoring Architect - Nagios/Op5 SME - ConsultantCommented:
No! where ever you are if u r using su then u have call su either directly as su if u r path variables are set to /bin, else you have use /bin/su -  -c .
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didier20Author Commented:
there's a file in /usr2/home/my username called folap. If I am in "my username" I can run the file folap with ./folap
If I change to /usr2/home and want to run the file with
su - my username -c /usr2/home/my username/folap
then the system ask me first for my password but afterwards I get the error message:

Xlib: connection to "localhost:0.0" refused by server
Xlib: Client is not authorized to connect to Server

I use the correct password.

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Maciej SsysadminCommented:
It's different problem. It means, that your X servers doesn't want to talk to you :)
First, run (as user, not root) "xhost +" command.
Then, run your folap application.
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