Efficient way to load user control from dll during runtime in c# csharp .net

I have created a user control library of composite user controls, each with a few simple buttons.

During runtime, I am able to load and unload these controls. I expect to have hundreds of these controls, and depending on user selections a different user control will be loaded.

The thing is, how do I do this without creating a giant IF-ELSE statement? I thought about storing some info in a database, but I'm not sure what info to put in the DB that I can use to actually instantiate the user control in the dll.

In other words, I know I can: myCustomUserControl X = new myCustomUserControl(), and add via to MyPanel.Controls.Add(X) ..... but, how can I do the same thing using a database that will have some kind of reference to the myCustomUserControl in the DLL?

This way, I could do a DB lookup, and then a load, instead of a huge Switch or If-Else...

can anyone help??



yaronusaAsked:
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WeiXiCommented:
You can dynamically construct your user-controls during runtime by help of the System.Type and System.Reflection.ConstructorInfo classes. You have to know the assembly-qualified name of the control you want to load, though:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.type.assemblyqualifiedname.aspx

You can determine the fully-qualified name of the control via (using your control X from the question):
X.GetType().AssemblyQualifiedName

The first part of the fully-qualified name is the control itself, the second part the assembly. As an example, for the built-in Label it looks something like this:
"System.Windows.Forms.Label, System.Windows.Forms, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral"

So once, you figured out the full assembly name, you just have to change the Control-name in the first part for getting different Controls. All you need to store in your database is the name of the controls and the fully-qualified assembly names. With these you can construct a string to pass to Type.GetType().

The attached code snippet constructs a built.in Label object in my environment. I hope this helps.
System.Type t = Type.GetType("System.Windows.Forms.Label, System.Windows.Forms, Version=2.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089");
System.Reflection.ConstructorInfo ci = t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);
object o = ci.Invoke(null);
Control ctrl = o as Control;
if (ctrl != null)
    MyPanel.Controls.Add(ctrl);

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yaronusaAuthor Commented:
Holy Crap It Worked!

I must say your answer was the *very* comprehensive. Thanks-a-million!
yaronusaAuthor Commented:
Holy Crap It Worked!

I must say your answer was the *very* comprehensive. Thanks-a-million!
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