AD account keeps locking out

I have a user account that is getting locked out about every 5secs, we have a lockout policy set on 5 invalid attempts.
The user has changed his password as per our password ageing policy and since then it keeps locking out. I'm assuming it's because there is another process that is trying to access his account using the old password so I looked in the event viewer on the DC and I don't see any events logged for the account locking

I have set the Domain policy to log all logon failures but the only event I see is for Success Audit, how do I get logon failures to display in the event viewer, and any other event I might need to track down the offending process?
BrianFordAsked:
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maze-ukConnect With a Mentor Commented:
follow the white rabbit, brian :-)

ALTools.exe contains tools that assist you in managing accounts and in troubleshooting account lockouts. Use these tools in conjunction with the Account Passwords and Policies white paper.
ALTools.exe includes:
AcctInfo.dll. Helps isolate and troubleshoot account lockouts and to change a user's password on a domain controller in that user's site. It works by adding new property pages to user objects in the Active Directory Users and Computers Microsoft Management Console (MMC).

ALockout.dll. On the client computer, helps determine a process or application that is sending wrong credentials.
Caution: Do not use this tool on servers that host network applications or services. Also, you should not use ALockout.dll on Exchange servers, because it may prevent the Exchange store from starting.

ALoInfo.exe. Displays all user account names and the age of their passwords.

EnableKerbLog.vbs. Used as a startup script, allows Kerberos to log on to all your clients that run Windows 2000 and later.

EventCombMT.exe. Gathers specific events from event logs of several different machines to one central location.

LockoutStatus.exe. Determines all the domain controllers that are involved in a lockout of a user in order to assist in gathering the logs. LockoutStatus.exe uses the NLParse.exe tool to parse Netlogon logs for specific Netlogon return status codes. It directs the output to a comma-separated value (.csv) file that you can sort further, if needed.

NLParse.exe. Used to extract and display desired entries from the Netlogon log files.
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dmarinenkoCommented:
Under event viewr, right click on security, and go to properties.
Then under I believe filter, check the audity failed logins.

Also look under the services (Services.msc after clicking run in the start menu)
Make sure there aren't services running under that account
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BrianFordAuthor Commented:
I have that tool, but it doesn't tell me where the process that's trying to logon is coming from, it just lets me un-lockit, unless I'm using the tool wrong
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BrianFordAuthor Commented:
I have tried the filter, there are NO Audit Failures being logged
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BrianFordAuthor Commented:
Thanks maze, I guess I need to learn how to use this tool :)
however, how come I don't see any audit failures showing in the event log?
 
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BrianFordAuthor Commented:
Thanks, I managed to find the offending process :)
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maze-ukCommented:
did you check all the DCs? Use EventcombMT for that: gather specific events on all (or limited set) DCs...
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BrianFordAuthor Commented:
yes, I managed to find the offending connection, thanks for your help :)
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KETTANEHCommented:
i've faced similar issue with one user before. his machine was infected with a virus.
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