Outgoing SMTP Port in Exchange

Hi,

I want to change the outgoing port for an Exchange 2003 server (in fact set up as part of a SBS 2003 server).

I know how to change the outgoing port by going to Servers/ServerName/Protocols/SMTP and changing the properties of the Default SMTP Server, but we are sending out using an SMTP connector (the default "SmallBusiness SMTP connector" that is set up automatically in fact).

I know how to change the outgoing security in this, but there does not seem to be an option to change the port.

Is it possible to change the outgoing port using an SMTP connector, or will we have to remove the connector and just use the SMTP server natively to be able to control this?

Thanks
SafeserveAsked:
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KevinBallConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The send connector simply takes connections from the virtual server and 'channels' them.  It will respect the port settings in the SMTP virtual server that is named as its bridgehead server.
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abhaighCommented:
First question is what are trying to accomplish here? Why do you want to change the outbound port?
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nskursCommented:
You can change this port setting it via MetaEdit or any other metabase editing tool in SBS Env.
Changing the port using Metaedit tool will change the port for all of your connectors.

- Cheers!
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KevinBallCommented:
Why would you want to hack it using MetaEdit when a solution to change it via the GUI exists?  The later is much less likely to create support issues in the future.
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SafeserveAuthor Commented:
I tried the first suggestion and it seemed to work fine, so I think I will go with that!

Just for your info the reason we are doing it is this (well this is a simplified reason, but it should make it clear)...  We have separate inbound and outbound servers on the internet.  Our inbound servers look after several domains and route the mail on to wherever it should go, in most cases an Exchange server.  The outbound servers accept connections from these Exchange servers and relay it on.

The outbound servers should not accept incoming SMTP traffic from anyone else, but we didn't want to end up with long-winded firewall rules, listing the IP addresses that were allowed to connect, as we are adding and removing these addresses frequently.

The software on the mail server supports the functionality of accepting SMTP traffic on an alternate port and insisting on authentication on this port, so we decided to block port 25 to all IPs and insist everybody sends out using port 587 with authentication over TLS.

Like I said, that is a slight simplification, and there are actually a couple  of other reasons why we want to close off port 25, but that's the gist.

Hope that helps!
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SafeserveAuthor Commented:
Cheers!
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