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IBM server - xSeries

Hi,

one of our clients dropped of an IBM xSeries server for us to co-host for them.
its an xSeries 345
with a pentium III 2.4GHz (2 of them)
1.5GB RAM installed
Operating on Windows Server 2000

The issue is that when powerd on the fans race to max which is the norm, but after about 10 seconds there is no change to fans? They stay at what appears to be max revolutions for the entire time we have had the server on for, which so far is 20 mins as can't cope with the noise in the office anymore.

Are there any reasons for this, is this norm for an IBM sever of this age???

Ta
0
YellowbusTeam
Asked:
YellowbusTeam
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2 Solutions
 
lnkevinCommented:
This type of comercial server requires room temperature around 65 degree or below. If you put it in a cozy office with temperature around 75 plus, it will exelarate the fans at best. Lower down the room temperature you will see the improvement, but you will never make it as quiet as a PC. It will be a bit noisy in the office for sure. To improve it to the lowest audible noise, you need to open more cool air blows to it, a portable AC may do it or move it to a cold and private room.

K
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YellowbusTeamAuthor Commented:
Are you talking about 'C or 'F?
So that level of noise is the norm for a big comercial server from IBM, its just we are used to the DELL's which go quiet after 10 seconds of being on.

Thanks for the help.
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lnkevinCommented:
I am talking about F.
It depends on what model of Dell. The older model does not have fan speed controller in bios and it's much noisy. You can check the bios of the IBM machine to see if there is an option to set fan level to the temperature... However, the average temperature for these IBM should be 65 F. If you can provide that cool air, you will see your server is much quieter.

K
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YellowbusTeamAuthor Commented:
Ok, cheers mate, thats a great help.
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lnkevinCommented:
I am glad it does!

Cheers,

K
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