How to set and use external variables in shell scripts?

We have 4 layers(dev, tst, at, pd) on the same server where a korn shell script will run on all 4 layers.

I want to make the script generic where I have 4 copies of the same script, one on each layer. I'd like to determine which layer the script is running from using a form of environment variable. I've been told I can create an environment file that will exist on each layer with it's correcponding layer value and then refer to that variable in the shell script.

As I'm not proficient in unix, I need to know how I may be able to do this,

For instance I can create the following ksh file that would reside in the same location as the shell script:
#!/bin/ksh

ENV_LAYER=dev     # this env variable needs to be updated to dev, tst, at, pd
export ENV_LAYER

But then I don't know how or if I can access this variable in the script???

Thanks.
trh_garrAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
omarfaridCommented:
source means that the sell script that source will read and execute it in the current shell context and hence if there is an env variable setting then it will read it and set it in its env.
0
 
omarfaridCommented:
you can always source the file with

. /path/to/file (please note the dot and space)
0
 
woolmilkporcCommented:
Hi,

for each layer create a file containing

ENV_LAYER=[layer]

name it e.g. layer.conf and make it executable (chmod +x layer.conf)

In the common script simply do

.  /path/to/layer.conf

and use the variable ENV_LAYER as before.

Note the dot[space] (. ), it is very important.

wmp



0
Get expert help—faster!

Need expert help—fast? Use the Help Bell for personalized assistance getting answers to your important questions.

 
trh_garrAuthor Commented:
omarfarid:

you can always source the file with

. /path/to/file (please note the dot and space)

Sorry but I don't know what you mean "source the file".

Told you I wasn't unix proficient
0
 
trh_garrAuthor Commented:
Told you I wasn't unix proficient

I just re read this an it doesn't sound the way I intended, sorry.

What I was trying to say is that I REALLY am not proficient in unix. :)
0
 
TintinCommented:
Another approach is to simply have a configuration file, eg: /etc/layer.conf

with the contents dev, tst, at or pd, eg:

dev

then in your script you do

ENV_LAYER=$(cat /etc/layer.conf)

0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.