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Database size limit

Posted on 2009-04-03
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Hi,

I have data more than 2 terra bytes to be migrated to Database platform. Which database (Oracle / SQL Server) supports more than 2 terra bytes with Windows or Linux platform?

Can you suggest me which is the suitable platform i need to select (Hardware, OS and Database)

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Question by:sudhir_gs1
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morsun earned 500 total points
ID: 24066358
In oracle 10g and 11g you can create bigfile tablespace which can store more than 120TB in one datafile. But i don't think you will need them. I would recommend using oracle on 64bit linux or unix system as oracle sends patches for linux at first place.
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by:dportas
ID: 24066474
Both Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server can hand multi-terabyte databases. Microsoft SQL Server is Windows only. Oracle is Linux and Windows although Linux is a more popular platform for Oracle.

Think about what features you need from DBMS rather than just the size. Estimate what workload you need to support (how many transactions, reads vs writes) to help you choose the hardware. Most DBMS applications are IO bound so the storage hardware is just as important as the server hardware.
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by:dportas
ID: 24066477
Correction: "hand" = "handle"
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by:sudhir_gs1
ID: 24066672
Hi Thanks for response.

Can i look forward with Microsoft products, SQL Server and Win 2003 server? Because our customer has license for this
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by:dportas
ID: 24066812
Do you still have a question? What do you want to know?
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by:morsun
ID: 24066818
Of course you can, everything depends on you...
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by:mrjoltcola
ID: 24067926
Since SQL Server has already been discussed, I'll give the Oracle opinion.

Oracle runs just fine on Windows, as just well as Linux or other UNIX. The downside to SQL Server is you are pretty much stuck with Windows. If that is not a problem for your long-term strategy, then don't worry about it. (See recent Conficker virus scare for why I don't recommend Windows as servers)

Regarding 2tb databases, Oracle is the more advanced the two, especially regarding backup and recovery and managing huge databases. When you buy Oracle you get RMAN with it, which is a very advanced, featureful recovery manager of which the other vendows do hot have a good equivalent, or you have to pay for a 3rd party add-on.

You should choose based on your in-house skillset. If you have no UNIX people, than going Linux is just going to impede your work, then choose Windows. But if you have moderate UNIX skillset, the Linux option gives more options with remote access, scripting and automation with a lot of available examples online.

Thats the advantage of dbms systems that are multi-platform. you can make wise choises on OS independently of the DB choice. Microsoft requires Microsoft. But I am NOT against Microsoft. I have several Windows Server 200 and 2003 with Oracle 10 that serve me well, that have been running without reboots for 2+ years.

If it comes to cost, at least look at Oracle Standard Edition or Standard Edition One at the lowest end.

My customer's most common choices that are rock solid?
1 - Enterprise Linux with Oracle 10.2
2 - Windows Server 2003 with SQL Server 2005

Both serve well. Eventually managing very large database growth with SQL server will present more headaches, in my opinion.

Stick with commodity hardware like Dell or HP core2 x64 chips with a lot of RAM. For 2TB storage, consider Netapp or low end EMC Carion subsystem with plenty of room for online hot backups and archive. Even lower end, a cheap SATA RAID with good cache can also be used, go mininum RAID 10 or RAID 0+1 with separate disks for the backup / archival.
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