Enumeration Explanation of {0}

I was wondering I've seen enumeration values accessed and output in two ways one was by array/element notation and the other which included {0}, {1} could someone give me a detailed explanation of this from the following code example.

I understand that there's some value swopping going on but I'm not sure I understand why.  I've search msdn but to no avail.
using System;
public class EnumTest 
{
    enum Days {Sat=1, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri};
 
    static void Main() 
    {
        int x = (int)Days.Sun;
        int y = (int)Days.Fri;
        Console.WriteLine("Sun = {0}", x);
        Console.WriteLine("Fri = {0}", y);
    }
}

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kvigorAsked:
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pivarConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi,

{0} is just a placeholder to show how you want to format the output from WriteLine with value x (or y). This will show the enum value as an int (since it'sconverted to an int) after the dayname. In this case "Sun=2" and "Fri=7".

Look here
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/txafckwd(VS.71).aspx


/peter
0
 
brawneyConnect With a Mentor Commented:
To expand on pivar's answer...  it is a placeholder to indicate what parameter you're passing to the WriteLine function.  Another example:

Console.WriteLine("Sun={0} and Fri={1}", x, y);

would print

Sun=2 and Fri=7

0
 
kvigorAuthor Commented:
Very Well Done, I appreciate the responsiveness conciseness of your answers
0
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