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Autoconfiguring hosts for IPv6 via Cisco router

I've successfully setup a tunnel with my Cisco router with a little help from the guys over that the Tunnel Broker Forum. http://www.tunnelbroker.net/forums/index.php?topic=242.0

I'm now trying to allow my Vista and XP clients on the network to auto configure their interfaces for IPv6. http://www.tunnelbroker.net/forums/index.php?topic=254.0

I'm not sure what I need to enable on the Cisco routers local interface to allow my clients to auto configure and obtain a v6 IP?
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adamshields
Asked:
adamshields
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2 Solutions
 
QuoriCommented:
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
I don't think it's necessarily DHCP...

Anyhow when applying the IP I get an error.

#ipv6 address 2001:470:XXXX:XXX::/64
% 2001:470:XXXX:XXX::/64 should not be configured on FastEthernet0/1.2, a subnet router anycast
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QuoriCommented:
Put eui-64 at the end of the ipv6 address statement:

ipv6 address 2001:470:XXXX:XXX::/64 eui-64
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
@Quori, what's the difference between anycast and eui-64 in laments terms?

#ipv6 address 2001:470:xxxx:xxx::/64 ?
  anycast  Configure as an anycast
  eui-64   Use eui-64 interface identifier
  <cr>
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
My Vista box is still not picking up a IPv6
interface FastEthernet0/1.2
 description $FW_INSIDE$
 encapsulation dot1Q 2
 ip address 172.16.2.1 255.255.255.0
 ip access-group 101 in
 no ip unreachables
 ip nat inside
 ip virtual-reassembly
 ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::/64 eui-64
 ipv6 enable

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QuoriCommented:
EUI-64 adds the padding to the specified IPv6 address. Because stateless configuration (aka autoconfiguration) uses the MAC address to generate an IPv6 address, the router needs extra details - Why? a MAC address is only 48 bits long, and the interface portion of an IPv6 address is 64bits long, it needs the extra 16 bits - so its padded with FFFE in the middle.

EG:
Take a MAC address of 0060.d673.1987 after padding it would look like this 0260.d6ff.fe73.1987
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
@Quori, okay I understand that.

I've tried the three following combination's with no luck:


interface FastEthernet0/1.2
 description $FW_INSIDE$
 encapsulation dot1Q 2
 ip address 172.16.2.1 255.255.255.0
 ip access-group 101 in
 no ip unreachables
 ip nat inside
 ip virtual-reassembly
 ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::1/64
 ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::/64 eui-64
 ipv6 enable
 ipv6 nd prefix 2001:470:880D::/64 infinite infinite

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QuoriCommented:
Never tried it on Vista (I loathe Vista). Will let you know what I dig up on it.
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
lol, well I just fired up a XP and Ubuntu box and got similar results.
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 4:
 
        Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 172.16.2.10
        Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
        IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::20c:29ff:fe70:78c2%4
        Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 172.16.2.1
 
$ ifconfig
eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:0c:29:89:f9:3a
          inet addr:172.16.2.4  Bcast:172.16.2.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          inet6 addr: fe80::20c:29ff:fe89:f93a/64 Scope:Link
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:44 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:90 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:5615 (5.6 KB)  TX bytes:13293 (13.2 KB)

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QuoriCommented:
Try removing the ACL from your router interface and let me know how you go.
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
Hmm didn't make a difference when I removed the ACL 101 on that interface. From what I understood IPv6 would be pretty much independent from IPv4.
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QuoriCommented:
It is, just ensuring you had nothing in there that could possibly be causing an issue (since you didn't provide a full config.

Let me lab it up and I'll get back to you.
Have only just started major IPv6 stuff myself.
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
config attached...
3725router-confg.txt
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
I didn't have:

#ipv6 unicast-routing

so now it works with just the IP set. With that said what are the benefits to each of the following?

I've been told three different methods and since I'm also new to this I'm just trying to figure out the benefits to each one. Basically I'm asking why bother with the latter two if the first one works?

ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::1/64

ipv6 nd prefix 2001:470:1F07:3B6::/64 infinite infinite

ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::/64 eui-64
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QuoriCommented:
You don't have ipv6 unicast-routing enabled in your config
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QuoriCommented:
Damn it lol
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
don't worry you're getting the points but do you know why someone would bother with the last two commands. You explained the third one but I don't really see the point if it seems to automagically work by just specifying the IP...

pv6 address 2001:470:880D::1/64

ipv6 nd prefix 2001:470:1F07:3B6::/64 infinite infinite

ipv6 address 2001:470:880D::/64 eui-64
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QuoriCommented:
Auto configuration doesn't occur without the EUI-64.
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
That's strange b/c I have:

ipv6 address 2001:470:880D:0::1/64
and
pv6 address 2001:470:880D:1::1/64

on two separate interfaces and the machines on both networks are grabbing v6 IP's..
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QuoriCommented:
Shut down the interfaces then bring them back up and see if they get it again.

Have a read over:

http://wiki.nil.com/IPv6_EUI-64_interface_addressing
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adamshieldsAuthor Commented:
Okay thanks. It appears I can autoconfigure with eui-64 or specify the IP

ipv6 address 2001:470:xxxx::/64 eui-64

or

ipv6 address 2001:470:xxxx:0::1/64
ipv6 address 2001:470:xxxx:1::1/64
.
etc...

They both work for me :-).

Auto generate based on mac address works but for router interfaces I would assume it would be beneficial to use a static based scheme....
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QuoriCommented:
Yeah.

You can use EUI-64 and autogenerate the IP of the router, which will also provide support for autoconfig of any hosts behind the router.
Or you can use a manual address method and specify the ipv6 nd parameter for handling any stateless config without eui-64
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