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DNS

Posted on 2009-04-05
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My network has some DNS issues.  They are not blarring but rather underlying and hard to troubleshoot.  I spoke with the old Network Engineer and he informed me that he believes there are WINS servers somewhere on the network.  The network was once on Windows Server 2000 then upgraded to Windows 2003 and Active Directory.  Last year AD was switched to native mode.  

The symptoms I see are in our web traffic monitoring tool.  The IP of the machine, name of the machine and name of person logged in do not match up.  The provider of that tool assures me that all of that information comes directly from our DNS.

How can I determine if there are WINS servers on our network?  What issues can arise from migrating to 2003 and then switching to native mode?

I realize this is an indepth question so I will be increasing the points as needed...Thanks
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Question by:brendanosmith
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Alan earned 1500 total points
ID: 24074943
Hi,

When you say that:

"The IP of the machine, name of the machine and name of person logged in do not match up."

what do you mean exactly?  From what you say, I am guessing that the info is coming from a bespoke application that you are using to log traffic on an internal website?

If so, first, there would not really be any necessary link between a user and a machine (although high correlation is likely).

Let's look at the hostname and IP first, then worry about the user matchup after.

If you ping a machine (hostname), does it match the IP address of the machine (confirm by checking the machine itself using ipconfig / all)?

Also, if you ping -a the IP address, does it match the hostname:

PING -A 192.168.1.1

Post back with those results first.

Thanks,

Alan.
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