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snmpd runs on CENTOS, but Orion Network Performance Monitor can't talk to it.

Posted on 2009-04-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I have two CENTOS 5 boxes that I installed net-smtp on, and ps claims it's running.

The Orion tools cannot connect to it, though. Orion has connected to dozens of other nodes, switches, Windows boxes and OpenBSD, but can't see these.

The config file (with security redactions) is below. It does not differ from the one that OpenBSD is using other than in using different community strings; Orion is being told the correct string. The Orion server can ping the CENTOS boxes with no difficulty.
###############################################################################

#

# snmpd.conf:

#   An example configuration file for configuring the ucd-snmp snmpd agent.

#

###############################################################################

#

# This file is intended to only be as a starting point.  Many more

# configuration directives exist than are mentioned in this file.  For

# full details, see the snmpd.conf(5) manual page.

#

# All lines beginning with a '#' are comments and are intended for you

# to read.  All other lines are configuration commands for the agent.
 

###############################################################################

# Access Control

###############################################################################
 

# As shipped, the snmpd demon will only respond to queries on the

# system mib group until this file is replaced or modified for

# security purposes.  Examples are shown below about how to increase the

# level of access.
 

# By far, the most common question I get about the agent is "why won't

# it work?", when really it should be "how do I configure the agent to

# allow me to access it?"

#

# By default, the agent responds to the "public" community for read

# only access, if run out of the box without any configuration file in

# place.  The following examples show you other ways of configuring

# the agent so that you can change the community names, and give

# yourself write access to the mib tree as well.

#

# For more information, read the FAQ as well as the snmpd.conf(5)

# manual page.
 

####

# First, map the community name "public" into a "security name"
 

#       sec.name  source          community

#com2sec notConfigUser  default     public

#com2sec mynetwork	NETWORK/24	public	
 

####

# Second, map the security name into a group name:
 

#       groupName      securityModel securityName

#group   notConfigGroup v1           notConfigUser

#group   notConfigGroup v2c           notConfigUser
 

####

# Third, create a view for us to let the group have rights to:
 

# Make at least  snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public system fast again.

#       name           incl/excl     subtree         mask(optional)

view    systemview    included   .1.3.6.1.2.1.1

view    systemview    included   .1.3.6.1.2.1.25.1.1
 

####

# Finally, grant the group read-only access to the systemview view.
 

#       group          context sec.model sec.level prefix read   write  notif

access  notConfigGroup ""      any       noauth    exact  systemview none none
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

# Here is a commented out example configuration that allows less

# restrictive access.
 

# YOU SHOULD CHANGE THE "COMMUNITY" TOKEN BELOW TO A NEW KEYWORD ONLY

# KNOWN AT YOUR SITE.  YOU *MUST* CHANGE THE NETWORK TOKEN BELOW TO

# SOMETHING REFLECTING YOUR LOCAL NETWORK ADDRESS SPACE.
 

##       sec.name  source          community

com2sec local     localhost     public

com2sec mynetwork 10.11.13.0/24    public
 

##     group.name sec.model  sec.name

group MyRWGroup  any        local

group MyROGroup  any        mynetwork

#

#group MyRWGroup  any        otherv3user

#...
 

##           incl/excl subtree                          mask

view all    included  .1                               80
 

## -or just the mib2 tree-
 

#view mib2   included  .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2 fc
 
 

##                context sec.model sec.level prefix read   write  notif

access MyROGroup ""      any       noauth    0      all    none   none

#access MyRWGroup ""      any       noauth    0      all    all    all
 
 

###############################################################################

# Sample configuration to make net-snmpd RFC 1213.

# Unfortunately v1 and v2c don't allow any user based authentification, so

# opening up the default config is not an option from a security point.

#

# WARNING: If you uncomment the following lines you allow write access to your

# snmpd daemon from any source! To avoid this use different names for your

# community or split out the write access to a different community and

# restrict it to your local network.

# Also remember to comment the syslocation and syscontact parameters later as

# otherwise they are still read only (see FAQ for net-snmp).

#
 

# First, map the community name "public" into a "security name"

#       sec.name        source          community

com2sec notConfigUser   default        notArealString
 

com2sec local     localhost      notArealString

com2sec mynetwork 10.11.13.0/24     notArealString
 

# Second, map the security name into a group name:

#       groupName       securityModel   securityName

group   notConfigGroup  v1              notConfigUser

group   notConfigGroup  v2c             notConfigUser
 

# Third, create a view for us to let the group have rights to:

# Open up the whole tree for ro, make the RFC 1213 required ones rw.

#       name            incl/excl       subtree mask(optional)

view    roview          included        .1

#view    rwview          included        system.sysContact

#view    rwview          included        system.sysName

#view    rwview          included        system.sysLocation

#view    rwview          included        interfaces.ifTable.ifEntry.ifAdminStatus

#view    rwview          included        at.atTable.atEntry.atPhysAddress

#view    rwview          included        at.atTable.atEntry.atNetAddress

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipForwarding

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipDefaultTTL

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteDest

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteIfIndex

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric1

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric2

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric3

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric4

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteType

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteAge

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMask

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric5

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaIfIndex

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaPhysAddress

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaNetAddress

#view    rwview          included        ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaType

#view    rwview          included        tcp.tcpConnTable.tcpConnEntry.tcpConnState

#view    rwview          included        egp.egpNeighTable.egpNeighEntry.egpNeighEventTrigger

#view    rwview          included        snmp.snmpEnableAuthenTraps
 

# Finally, grant the group read-only access to the systemview view.

#       group          context sec.model sec.level prefix read   write  notif

access  notConfigGroup ""      any       noauth    exact  roview rwview none
 
 
 

###############################################################################

# System contact information

#
 

# It is also possible to set the sysContact and sysLocation system

# variables through the snmpd.conf file:
 

syslocation Unknown (edit /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf)

syscontact Root <root@localhost> (configure /etc/snmp/snmp.local.conf)
 

# Example output of snmpwalk:

#   % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public system

#   system.sysDescr.0 = "SunOS name sun4c"

#   system.sysObjectID.0 = OID: enterprises.ucdavis.ucdSnmpAgent.sunos4

#   system.sysUpTime.0 = Timeticks: (595637548) 68 days, 22:32:55

#   system.sysContact.0 = "Me <me@somewhere.org>"

#   system.sysName.0 = "name"

#   system.sysLocation.0 = "Right here, right now."

#   system.sysServices.0 = 72
 
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# Process checks.

#

#  The following are examples of how to use the agent to check for

#  processes running on the host.  The syntax looks something like:

#

#  proc NAME [MAX=0] [MIN=0]

#

#  NAME:  the name of the process to check for.  It must match

#         exactly (ie, http will not find httpd processes).

#  MAX:   the maximum number allowed to be running.  Defaults to 0.

#  MIN:   the minimum number to be running.  Defaults to 0.
 

#

#  Examples (commented out by default):

#
 

#  Make sure mountd is running

#proc mountd
 

#  Make sure there are no more than 4 ntalkds running, but 0 is ok too.

#proc ntalkd 4
 

#  Make sure at least one sendmail, but less than or equal to 10 are running.

#proc sendmail 10 1
 

#  A snmpwalk of the process mib tree would look something like this:

#

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.1 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.2 = 2

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.3 = 3

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.1 = "mountd"

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.2 = "ntalkd"

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.3 = "sendmail"

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.2 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.3 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.2 = 4

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.3 = 10

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.2 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.3 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.1 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.2 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.3 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.1 = "No mountd process running."

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.2 = ""

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.3 = ""

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.2 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.3 = 0

#

#  Note that the errorFlag for mountd is set to 1 because one is not

#  running (in this case an rpc.mountd is, but thats not good enough),

#  and the ErrMessage tells you what's wrong.  The configuration

#  imposed in the snmpd.conf file is also shown.

#

#  Special Case:  When the min and max numbers are both 0, it assumes

#  you want a max of infinity and a min of 1.

#
 
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# Executables/scripts

#
 

#

#  You can also have programs run by the agent that return a single

#  line of output and an exit code.  Here are two examples.

#

#  exec NAME PROGRAM [ARGS ...]

#

#  NAME:     A generic name.

#  PROGRAM:  The program to run.  Include the path!

#  ARGS:     optional arguments to be passed to the program
 

# a simple hello world
 

#exec echotest /bin/echo hello world
 

# Run a shell script containing:

#

# #!/bin/sh

# echo hello world

# echo hi there

# exit 35

#

# Note:  this has been specifically commented out to prevent

# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing

# a /tmp/shtest before you do.  Uncomment to use it.

#

#exec shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest
 

# Then,

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.8

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.1 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.2 = 2

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.1 = "echotest"

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.2 = "shelltest"

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.1 = "/bin/echo hello world"

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.2 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.2 = 35

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.1 = "hello world."

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.2 = "hello world."

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.2 = 0
 

# Note that the second line of the /tmp/shtest shell script is cut

# off.  Also note that the exit status of 35 was returned.
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# disk checks

#
 

# The agent can check the amount of available disk space, and make

# sure it is above a set limit.
 

# disk PATH [MIN=100000]

#

# PATH:  mount path to the disk in question.

# MIN:   Disks with space below this value will have the Mib's errorFlag set.

#        Default value = 100000.
 

# Check the / partition and make sure it contains at least 10 megs.
 

#disk / 10000
 

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.9

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskIndex.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPath.1 = "/" Hex: 2F

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskDevice.1 = "/dev/dsk/c201d6s0"

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskMinimum.1 = 10000

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskTotal.1 = 837130

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskAvail.1 = 316325

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskUsed.1 = 437092

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPercent.1 = 58

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorFlag.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorMsg.1 = ""
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# load average checks

#
 

# load [1MAX=12.0] [5MAX=12.0] [15MAX=12.0]

#

# 1MAX:   If the 1 minute load average is above this limit at query

#         time, the errorFlag will be set.

# 5MAX:   Similar, but for 5 min average.

# 15MAX:  Similar, but for 15 min average.
 

# Check for loads:

#load 12 14 14
 

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.10

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.1 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.2 = 2

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.3 = 3

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.1 = "Load-1"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.2 = "Load-5"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.3 = "Load-15"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.1 = "0.49" Hex: 30 2E 34 39

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.2 = "0.31" Hex: 30 2E 33 31

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.3 = "0.26" Hex: 30 2E 32 36

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.1 = "12.00"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.2 = "14.00"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.3 = "14.00"

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.1 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.2 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.3 = 0

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.1 = ""

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.2 = ""

# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.3 = ""
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# Extensible sections.

#
 

# This alleviates the multiple line output problem found in the

# previous executable mib by placing each mib in its own mib table:
 

# Run a shell script containing:

#

# #!/bin/sh

# echo hello world

# echo hi there

# exit 35

#

# Note:  this has been specifically commented out to prevent

# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing

# a /tmp/shtest before you do.  Uncomment to use it.

#

# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50 shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest
 

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.1.1 = 1

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.2.1 = "shelltest"

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.3.1 = "/bin/sh /tmp/shtest"

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.100.1 = 35

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.1 = "hello world."

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.2 = "hi there."

# enterprises.ucdavis.50.102.1 = 0
 

# Now the Output has grown to two lines, and we can see the 'hi

# there.' output as the second line from our shell script.

#

# Note that you must alter the mib.txt file to be correct if you want

# the .50.* outputs above to change to reasonable text descriptions.
 

# Other ideas:

#

# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.51 ps /bin/ps

# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.52 top /usr/local/bin/top

# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.53 mailq /usr/bin/mailq
 

# -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 

###############################################################################

# Pass through control.

#
 

# Usage:

#   pass MIBOID EXEC-COMMAND

#

# This will pass total control of the mib underneath the MIBOID

# portion of the mib to the EXEC-COMMAND.

#

# Note:  You'll have to change the path of the passtest script to your

# source directory or install it in the given location.

#

# Example:  (see the script for details)

#           (commented out here since it requires that you place the

#           script in the right location. (its not installed by default))
 

# pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255 /bin/sh /usr/local/local/passtest
 

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "life the universe and everything"

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.1 = 42

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.2 = OID: 42.42.42

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.3 = Timeticks: (363136200) 42 days, 0:42:42

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.4 = IpAddress: 127.0.0.1

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.6 = Gauge: 42

#

# % snmpget -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.5

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42

#

# % snmpset -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.1 s "New string"

# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = "New string"

#
 

# For specific usage information, see the man/snmpd.conf.5 manual page

# as well as the local/passtest script used in the above example.
 

# Added for support of bcm5820 cards.

pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.4413.4.1 /usr/bin/ucd5820stat
 

###############################################################################

# Further Information

#

#  See the snmpd.conf manual page, and the output of "snmpd -H".

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Question by:NetworkExEx
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5 Comments
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:Ron M
Comment Utility
I you running the linux firewall ?...SUSE ?
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Author Comment

by:NetworkExEx
Comment Utility
I'm checking on that, as I am in the network shop and am not the regular admin of this server.
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LVL 14

Accepted Solution

by:
small_student earned 125 total points
Comment Utility
To make sure you have your snmp setup correctly on your Linux Box do the following

1- configure your Linux box to respond to snmp queries, by defining a community string, I will consider the community string here to be the word hello , it can be anything you like.

vim /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf

rocommunity hello            

2- Start the service

/etc/init.d/snmpd start


3-To verify it is actually responding , query with snmpwalk first localy and then form the network to pin point where your problem is, I am assuming an IP address of 192.168.0.20 for the server

a/ Localy

snmpwalk -v 1 -c hello localhost system

b/ From Netwrok

snmpwalk -v1 -c hello 192.168.0.20 system

You should get a lot of info and return back to the prompt in both tests

Note: snmp uses port 161 UDP
Note: snmpwalk comes from the package net-snmp-utils

Good Luck
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Author Comment

by:NetworkExEx
Comment Utility
I've installed the utilities, verified that it is running, and it answers locally only.
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Author Comment

by:NetworkExEx
Comment Utility
Running snmpconf to get a smarter config file worked, however.
0

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