Solved

CIFS VFS: No writable handles for inode error locks up linux box

Posted on 2009-04-06
2
4,288 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have a process that moves files from a linux machine to a mounted share on a windows 2008 standard box. For some reason today the entire linux box locked up, and reported the following error:
CIFS VFS: No writable handles for inode

I had to restart the machine to be able to log back in.

1. Is there a way to kill this error without rebooting?
2. What caused this error?
3. What is the fix for it?
0
Comment
Question by:karnax
2 Comments
 
LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
computerfixins earned 500 total points
ID: 24079952
Typically it means the file closed while there still read or writes going on...
0
 

Author Comment

by:karnax
ID: 24528816
0

Featured Post

Back Up Your Microsoft Windows Server®

Back up all your Microsoft Windows Server – on-premises, in remote locations, in private and hybrid clouds. Your entire Windows Server will be backed up in one easy step with patented, block-level disk imaging. We achieve RTOs (recovery time objectives) as low as 15 seconds.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
How to Remove files with a Date in the Filename with Linux Scripting 3 44
cannot rename datastore 3 48
ftp to port 21 4 43
number in printf 13 27
How many times have you wanted to quickly do the same thing to a list but found yourself typing it again and again? I first figured out a small time saver with the up arrow to recall the last command but that can only get you so far if you have a bi…
SSH (Secure Shell) - Tips and Tricks As you all know SSH(Secure Shell) is a network protocol, which we use to access/transfer files securely between two networked devices. SSH was actually designed as a replacement for insecure protocols that sen…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

773 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question