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Cent OS vs. FreeBSD

Posted on 2009-04-07
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Im considering a new dedicated server and wanted to ask an expert what they feel is the best and most secure choice for Linux? I heard that CentOS is a bit unsecure is that true?
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Question by:vonfranzken
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WizRd-Linux earned 200 total points
ID: 24085425
Centos is often labelled as unsecure due to the fact that Redhat have to pickup the new versions / bug fixes and then centos picks them up a few days later.

Often your own box security policy and iptables setup decides how secure a node is....

more to the point investigate selinux if your overly concerned.
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by:fosiul01
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NOP!!! Centos is a copy of Redhat!!

if you dont want to pay Redhat, then go for Centos!!!  you will get same thing as REdhat in Centos

I never used FreeBSD so cant comment on that, but you can use either Centos, DEbain,Ubuntu all are almost same,

all my server is running on Centos, No problem atall .

but no security concern on Centos , if you patch your server regularly .


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by:sda100
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It depends on what you want out of your server really.  I run a popular binary Linux distro, and FreeBSD for different reasons.  The main ones are:

Linux - very compatible, and with a binary distro, less dependences to worry about.  However, packages aren't kept as up-to-date as you might like.  Eg. Nagios on Ubuntu is still over a year old.

FreeBSD - Easy to install packages either binary or from source and the 'Ports' (all 18,000+) of them tend to be kept very up-to-date.  However, can have some compatibility problems.

I actually prefer FreeBSD for most of my *ix servers, and use Linux when I know I might need some flexibility and compatibility.

Anyway, you could try them both... you can install FreeBSD in 2 minutes!

Steve :)
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by:hfraser
ID: 24085835
If you're interested in a secure BSD distribution, have a look at OpenBSD as well. Like FreeBSD and NetBSD, it's also based upon BSD, but its focus from the beginning has been security, involving a review of all critical code. They've cleaned upon thousands of holes over the years, and have produced a very secure base distribution.

Realistically, though, only the code they manage has been subjected to their rigorous review. If you install application "abc" with a security problem in it, it won't matter what OS you use.

Having said that, though, the selinux enhancements (available in Centos, fedora, and others) provides mandatory access controls that can significantly reduce the impact of the problems in application "abc".
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