?
Solved

Clarification of open-source licensing issues

Posted on 2009-04-08
2
Medium Priority
?
313 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-13
I apologise if my question appears to be a repeat of other posted questions about open source licensing  I have trawled the database and cant find anything that completely explains what I need to know. I am not expecting a lawyers response, but some good common-sense advice would be appreciated.

I am developing a software library that will link to two open source libraries, both of which are published under multiple licenses (GPL, LGPL, MPL). I assume that this means that my library would be considered a derivative work?

Although my development work is largely complete, I wish to create an open source project around it, in order to improve its maturity prior to release.

Once complete, I wish to incorporate my library in a proprietary application and possibly also commercially license it to other developers for use in their proprietary applications. Does this mean that it needs dual licenses? Are there any ethical issues with this? Are there any procedures I should follow when accepting public contributions?

Finally, when releasing my proprietary application, what is the correct procedure for distributing the binaries of the two other underlying libraries? Do I simply have to acknowledge them from within my own license file? If so, could you post some example wording?

Sorry for so many questions and many thanks for any insight you can offer.
0
Comment
Question by:Tim85
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 70

Accepted Solution

by:
Jason C. Levine earned 2000 total points
ID: 24102643
Hi Tim85,

It really is a tangled web :)

http://developer.kde.org/documentation/licensing/licenses_summary.html
http://khason.net/blog/open-source-licenses-comparison-table/

>> I assume that this means that my library would be considered a derivative work?

Yes.

>> I wish to incorporate my library in a proprietary application and possibly also commercially license it to other
>> developers for use in their proprietary applications. Does this mean that it needs dual licenses?

No, the LGPL provides for that.  The kicker is that the source must remain available.

>> Finally, when releasing my proprietary application, what is...

Sorry.  Can't help on that one.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Closing Comment

by:Tim85
ID: 31567937
Many thanks Jason1178. The two links that you included have provided some valuable clarity and perhaps one of their authors may be able to help my solve the final small part of this puzzle. Thanks again.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: IP Lookup

Get more info about an IP address or domain name, such as organization, abuse contacts and geolocation.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Entering a date in Microsoft Access can be tricky. A typo can cause month and day to be shuffled, entering the day only causes an error, as does entering, say, day 31 in June. This article shows how an inputmask supported by code can help the user a…
The SignAloud Glove is capable of translating American Sign Language signs into text and audio.
An introduction to basic programming syntax in Java by creating a simple program. Viewers can follow the tutorial as they create their first class in Java. Definitions and explanations about each element are given to help prepare viewers for future …
Progress

752 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question