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What is the difference between "Me.Recordset" and "Me.Report.Recordset" in an Access Report?

Posted on 2009-04-08
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Last Modified: 2013-11-28
I'm developing an Access 2007 "project" (.adp) as a front-end to a SQL Server 2005 Express database.

I have an Access "Report" that is based on a SQL Server "View".
I would like to trap the report (which is opened with a "WHERE" clause) if there are no records to print.

In the Report's "Report_Load" procedure I can check the "Me.Recordset.RecordCount" value, but I notice there is also a "Me.Report.Recordset.Recordcount" that can be checked.

Can someone explain the difference between a Report's "Me.Recordset" and "Me.Report.Recordset" and whether they are the same thing or might ever contain different values, and which of the two might be the more reliable to use?

Many thanks.
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Question by:colinasad
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Accepted Solution

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rockiroads earned 250 total points
ID: 24096226
Could you not use the NoData event to capture a report with no data?

No real different between Me.Recordset and Me.Report.Recordset, not that I know off anyway
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by:mbizup
mbizup earned 250 total points
ID: 24096422
Like rocki said, I don't think there is a difference between Me.Recordset and Me.Report.Recordset in the context you are using this.

The .Report property does have its applications though.

Consider the following as a reference to a subreport:

Me.MySubreportName

That refers to the "subreport control", or container that houses the subreport.  You can use this to get/set properties such as the border of the subreport, the master/child links the enabled or visible properties...

However to refer to the controls and properties within the subreport, you would need to add the .reprort property:

Me.MySubreportName.Report

With this addition, you are referring to the subreport as a report, not just a container, so you can refer to its controls etc:

Me.MySubreportName.Report.Mytextbox
Me.MySubreportName.Report.Recordset
etc...
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Author Closing Comment

by:colinasad
ID: 31567980
Thanks for the prompt responses.
I have been "incomminicado" for a couple of days after posting the question.
I hope you don't mind me splitting the points because you both gave me good advice.
Many thanks.
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by:rockiroads
ID: 24113986
No worries, glad we could all help :)
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Expert Comment

by:mbizup
ID: 24114497
Ditto!

Rocki (and colinasad),

Just FYI, the "Grading Comments" that Askers post while closing questions are only visible to the Askers and Experts whose answers have been accepted.

To everyone else, It just looks like we struck up a random conversation. ;-)
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Expert Comment

by:rockiroads
ID: 24114576
oooh, I didnt know that. Thanks for that bit of useful info.
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