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Upgrading Asterisk from 1.4.23 to 1.6

Posted on 2009-04-08
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What does upgrading Asterisk involve?  Is it a relatively easy process or am I going to have to go through a bunch of flaming hoops to get it running again?  I am relatively a newb to linux and asterisk.

My main reason for upgrading is for T.38 support.  Any suggestions or thoughts on that as well, would be appreciated.  Thanks!
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Question by:jkockler
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torimar earned 300 total points
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How did you install Asterisk in the first place?
There is no upgrade module or patch that you could apply. You will have to install 1.6 over 1.4.
Your current config files should reside in /etc/asterisk - make backup copies of them just in case. Then consult Chapter 3 of this free e-book: Asterisk - The Future of Telephony
http://cachefly.oreilly.com/books/9780596510480.pdf

The e-book only covers Asterisk 1.4, but the process will be basically the same. Just replace the download locations given for the several modules by this one central file:
http://downloads.digium.com/pub/asterisk/releases/asterisk-1.6.0.9.tar.gz
Study the README file, the "upgrade-1.6.txt" and the "Zaptel-to-DAHDI.txt" that are contained in this tarball.

At the end of the compilation process you will probably be asked whether sample documents/configuration files should be created - deny this. If your conf files get overwritten nonetheless, restore the backups you made.

I am not sure whether I should recommend this procedure to someone "relatively a newb" to Linux. Study the book chapter and the text files, and then decide for yourself whether you want to embark on it.
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by:ai_ja_nai
ai_ja_nai earned 200 total points
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Remove old asterisk first and then simply install it as indicated on the installation page of asterisk website. You won't go towards any trouble, if you meet all the dependencies. In case, you can backup the folders that contain the old version and the configuration files, so that you can re-deploy it easily if something goes wrong
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by:jkockler
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Kind of scary.  
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by:ai_ja_nai
ai_ja_nai earned 200 total points
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Then, don't update it.. Beside the question "Do you really need T.38 gateway support?", there's nothing to be scared about: just backup your files so that you can restore them and then uninstall the previous version and install the new one. Have you installed it by tar.gz?
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by:torimar
ID: 24108190
It isn't necessary to uninstall the old version first. There is no indication of this, neither in the files that come with the tarball, nor in reports on their forum. In fact, instruction files like "upgrade-1.6.txt" would be pointless if you had to uninstall first.
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by:ai_ja_nai
ID: 24108776
Point of views. I prefer to start always from a blank sheet, instead of slotting side by side different versions that may share the same places to put their own libraries
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by:Ron Malmstead
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Just want to comment on the idea of uninstalling / versus in place upgrade....

I ran into a show stopper issue with the version changes when DHADI was implemented over zaptel in version 1.4.23

Whether or not you do an inplace upgrade of Asterisk... you definitely should remove Zaptel if you are using it, before going to DAHDI.  Asterisk 1.6 only supports DAHDI, wherease 1.4.23 supports both...

Most experienced linux/Asterisk admins will know this, but the newbies probably will not...and will find out the hard way.
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by:Ron Malmstead
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by:jkockler
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Thank you xuserx2000.  I will keep it in mind, but for now I only use SIP.  Good info though, for anyone browsing the questions.
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by:torimar
ID: 24522565
"Study the README file, the "upgrade-1.6.txt" and the "Zaptel-to-DAHDI.txt" that are contained in this tarball."

That's a quote from my comment above. The information about Zaptel, DAHDI, and the way from one to the other is being described in the last text file referenced. Those Readmes are supposed to be studied prior to installation, and I hope that was clear from what and how I said it.

Reading carefully and making sure to understand what one reads is actually the first thing a "newbie" will have to learn about admin stuff and linux in general in order to avoid the "hard way" ;)
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