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Reverse DNS and smart host

If I change Exchange from sending mail directly to using a smart host (our ISP), does that have an impact on the PTR record for Reverse DNS checks ? Would it need to be changed ? Presently, we have a PTR record to resolves to mail.mydomain.com, which is our public ip address where traffic on port 25 is forwarded to our SBS2003 Exchange server.  

I'm trying to understand how a receiving server does it's Reverse DNS check. Is it done on the ip/name of the host server (our ISP) that would send the email for us, or does it do it based on the sender's domain name.

Thanks

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ndidomenico
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ndidomenico
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2 Solutions
 
AkhaterCommented:
The PTR check is done on the IP of the sending server so if you are using smart host it will be on your ISP's email not yours
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tigermattCommented:

When an email server opens an SMTP session to another mail server (in other words, your server connecting to the recipient's), it will provide a HELO or EHLO header which will generally be followed by the SMTP banner configured on the SMTP Virtual Server.

It is that SMTP banner which has the PTR check performed on it, to verify the IP the server initiating the connection with has the PTR matching the FQDN provided in the HELO/EHLO.

For sending mail via the ISP's Smart Host, the server will still send a banner like this, but the ISP doesn't care about your banner and will ignore it (they will accept your message once you have proved you can use their SMTP server, usually by means of username/password authentication). When the ISP relays the message and passes it on to be delivered, the ISP's server will provide a banner and it is THAT banner which has the PTR check performed on it.

-Matt
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ndidomenicoAuthor Commented:
So if I'm using my ISP's smart host for sending emails, it doesn't matter whether or not we have a properly set PTR record for our domain name for Revers DNS lookup ? It would never be checked by the receiving server, since it will only do a RDNS check based on my ISP's smart host FQDN?
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AkhaterCommented:
exactly
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tigermattCommented:

Correct. The ISP will ignore the PTR record because you authenticate to their server in order to relay via other means (username/password).

-Matt
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ndidomenicoAuthor Commented:
Ok. I think it's all clear now. Last question: how can I verify what is the HELO header and also the SMTP banner that is given out by Exchange to receiving servers ?

A Telnet session on port 25 of my Exchange server returns at the beginning:
"220 mail.mydomain.com Microsoft ESMTP MAIL Service, Version: 6.0.3790.3959 ready at  Wed, 8 Apr 2009 13:26:29 -0400"
Is this the SMTP banner ? And the name following the 220 code is what is used for the RDNS check ?

Then if I enter HELO and press enter, I get:
250 mail.mydomain.com Hello [10.0.1.100]
Is this the HELO header ?
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tigermattCommented:
The SMTP banner is the part after the '220' when you initiate a telnet session to the server. Whether it is HELO/EHLO doesn't have anything to do with the header which is sent; EHLO and HELO are just two different SMTP standards, with EHLO having wider support for more features than HELO, which is very basic for basic email transfer. The SMTP banner sent for each is the same.

-Matt
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ndidomenicoAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.
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