Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1494
  • Last Modified:

Is .net Response.OutputStream.Write asynchronous?

On Micorsofts website (http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=812406) there's an article showing how to download very large files from a website.

Works great but...

In their sample code (see code section) they allocate a 10,000 byte buffer to chunk the byte file stream to the output stream. Fine. But in the loop they re-allocate a new 10,000 byte buffer for each chunk. Seems like a waste of memory.

I can only image that response.outputstream.write is running in a separate thread and may still be using the original buffer. I can't find any info on threading for this method.

Any thoughts on why/if the reallocation is necessary?
System.IO.Stream iStream = null;
 
// Buffer to read 10K bytes in chunk:
byte[] buffer = new Byte[10000];
 
// Length of the file:
int length;
 
// Total bytes to read:
long dataToRead;
 
// Identify the file to download including its path.
string filepath  = "DownloadFileName";
 
// Identify the file name.
string  filename  = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(filepath);
 
try
{
	// Open the file.
	iStream = new System.IO.FileStream(filepath, System.IO.FileMode.Open, 
					System.IO.FileAccess.Read,System.IO.FileShare.Read);
 
 
	// Total bytes to read:
	dataToRead = iStream.Length;
 
	Response.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";
	Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename=" + filename);
 
	// Read the bytes.
	while (dataToRead > 0)
	{
		// Verify that the client is connected.
		if (Response.IsClientConnected) 
		{
			// Read the data in buffer.
			length = iStream.Read(buffer, 0, 10000);
 
			// Write the data to the current output stream.
			Response.OutputStream.Write(buffer, 0, length);
 
			// Flush the data to the HTML output.
			Response.Flush();
 
			buffer= new Byte[10000];
			dataToRead = dataToRead - length;
		}
		else
		{
			//prevent infinite loop if user disconnects
			dataToRead = -1;
		}
	}
}
catch (Exception ex) 
{
	// Trap the error, if any.
	Response.Write("Error : " + ex.Message);
}
finally
{
	if (iStream != null) 
	{
		//Close the file.
		iStream.Close();
	}
	Response.Close();
}

Open in new window

0
mduffin06
Asked:
mduffin06
1 Solution
 
burningmaceCommented:
It isn't necessary at all - the code would simply overwrite the old data with the new. You can comment line 46 out with no problems at all. I think the programmer did this just to make sure that the old data would not cause complications. However, it wouldn't be a waste of memory as the garbage collector would recognise that line 46 causes the old buffer asset to become orphaned and would unallocate it. I'm not sure how GC scheduling is handled in .NET, but the use of New may signal GC automatically to check if an old asset is being replaced. If not, then this method probably wastes around 500K of memory at peak before GC notices and clear it. Not really a huge issue with most systems having 1GB of memory or more these days. But yes, it is bad practice to do things like that.
0
 
mduffin06Author Commented:
Per burningmace advice, removed new allocation. Seems to work fine. No problems to date.
0

Featured Post

[Webinar] Cloud and Mobile-First Strategy

Maybe you’ve fully adopted the cloud since the beginning. Or maybe you started with on-prem resources but are pursuing a “cloud and mobile first” strategy. Getting to that end state has its challenges. Discover how to build out a 100% cloud and mobile IT strategy in this webinar.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now