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Help identifying DVR card

Posted on 2009-04-08
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1,134 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I recently had to reinstall a computer that has a DVR card installed. Unfortunately I can't find the install disks, and the card itself has no identifying markings on it. Usually, my go-to would be to look up the FCC code, but I can't even find that.  

Does anyone have any ideas?
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Question by:steam23
5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Sappbrosts
ID: 24101230
its a techwell 9903 or TW9903
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Author Comment

by:steam23
ID: 24101302
That's not a bad idea.. I can see that a chip on there. i think that might be the chipset, no?  Maybe I can track it down by finding which manufacturers used that chipset.. hmmm.
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Accepted Solution

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JohnnyCanuck earned 300 total points
ID: 24101580
If you plug it in (and windows can't get the drivers), look it up in device manager and get the vendor ID (it'll look like something like this "PCI_VEN1002&DEV_..BLAH BLAH" and should be under the details tab of the device properties).  Once you have the vendor ID you can google it or maybe find it here.

http://www.pcidatabase.com/
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LVL 62

Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 200 total points
ID: 24101981
It's a generic 8 channel MPEG-4 DVR card.  The Techwell chipset means the onboard hardware decoding should be pretty good.  Designed for security camera use rather than normal TV use though.

FWIW here's one being sold at the moment online from Montreal
http://www.shopsecurity.com/index.php?act=viewProd&productId=203 
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Author Closing Comment

by:steam23
ID: 31568228
Thanks for the tips. That Vendor ID trick is a good one, I'm sure I'll be using that a lot in the future.
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