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Blocking group policy for one user

Posted on 2009-04-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-24
We have recently applied a user GPO to the main OU that contains all of our users. There are some other child OUs under it but the policy is set to inherit from the parent.

We have one user who should not receive the policy. I would like to set it up so that the policy is not applied to him.

What I was thinking was a two step process.
1. First I will create a new ou outside of the OU that is applying the GPO and move his user account into it. This should unlock the settings that are currenlty being applied by the GPO and grayed out.
2. I am thinking that to block his access to receiving the policy I can set a deny read on the policy only for his user account. I have never done this before so Im looking for a little guidance.

Does this sounds like a correct way to go about this? Any other ideas or suggestions.

Thanks
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Question by:Joseph Daly
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Mike Kline earned 2000 total points
ID: 24101553
Yes option 2 is known as security filtering and that is all you have to do.
Step 1 -- select the group policy in GPMC, go the delegation tab and select advanced -- see first screen shot
step 2 -- then just select user user and select deny for read and apply group policy -- screen shot 2
Let me know if that helps or if you have any questions
Thanks
Mike

GPMC-Delegation-Advanced.jpg
Deny-read-and-apply.jpg
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by:Joseph Daly
ID: 24101574
If I remember correctly the Deny read will overtak any grant permissions correct?
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by:Justin Owens
ID: 24101605
Yes, deny always wins over grant.
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by:0xSaPx0
ID: 24101991

There are several ways of doing this:
  1. Block inheritance
    1. create a subcontainer and place obkjects you do not want the policy applied to
    2. apply policy to parent container and block policy inheritance on subcontainer
  2. policy inheritance
    1. create and apply policy
    2. create and apply "inverse policy"
    3. apply inverse policy using security filtering so it has higher precendence and aookies only to that user
  3. security filtering
    1. apply a policy only to that user OR
    2. apply a policy only to the users who are not that user
  4. loopback policy
    1. create a policy and place in in a workstation container. there is a "loopback policy processing" in the computer configuration section you can set to "merge"
    2. either in that policy or in a separate policy object in that computer container, configure your user policies
      the user policies in that container will "merge" with the policies in the user container
security filtering is found by selecting the group policy object and looking at the Scope tab.  Use groups and/or users lists to help narrow the scope down
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Expert Comment

by:Mike Kline
ID: 24102167
loopback is overkill here :)
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by:Americom
ID: 24104056
I agreed loopback is not needed here. Just do what Mike suggested above. One thing you might want to do is instead of deny to an individual user account, deny by group account instead. You may later decide that another user also need to be denied. Then all you have to do is add the user to this group instead of making change on the GPO again and creating extra works and traffic.
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