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file transfer rate with SCP

Posted on 2009-04-08
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
currently, i am able to scp the files from server A (newyork) to serverB(las vegas) at the rate of 500 kbps. i want to increase the speed of transfer rate. is there anything that i can do from my end i.e on server A and server B?
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Question by:ramavenkatesa
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 24102491
You can compress the files prior to scp.  What is the Bandwidth between A and B?
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Author Comment

by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24102573
How can i find the bandwidth between the servers?
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by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24102579
compressing may not be helpful to me.
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by:arnold
arnold earned 150 total points
ID: 24103168
What Type of connection do you have on Side A?  What type of connection you have on Site B?  The lower one is what you get between Site A and site B in optimal conditions.  If there are other resources using the network/internet, the amount of bandwith available to each server is reduced.

Depending on what the file is compression will reduce the amount of data that needs to be transferred.

Compress a file and see whether the transfer takes as long as transferring the uncompressed file.  Do not look at the average transfer rate for improvement.
I.e. a 500K uncompressed file  that is lets say 350k compressed file the transfer rate between the two might remain at 500kbps, but the amount of time to transfer will be reduced.
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Author Comment

by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24103335
What Type of connection do you have on Side A?   -- i did not understand . can u please elaborate?

in unix what is the command to be used to zip the files?  
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 24103393
Compression is only useful on slow links.

Is the network between the two servers on a LAN, WAN, VPN, etc?

What type of files are you transferring?  Are they text or binary data?

Are you transferring unique files each time?
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Author Comment

by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24103487
i think it is WAN( the starting 3 digits of IP of server A & server B are different)
i am transferring the datafiles of a database. mostly they are text files. some are bianry.

i am transfering unique files.
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Tintin earned 350 total points
ID: 24103556
Try compression, with the -C flag and see if it is any better, eg:

scp -C file serverB:/path
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Author Comment

by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24103568
after scp'ing Shd i do any gunzip or uncompress?
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Author Comment

by:ramavenkatesa
ID: 24103572
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 24103597
The -C option compresses the data in transit.  No need to compress/uncompress the files before/after issuing scp.
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