Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 817
  • Last Modified:

How do I use regular expressions to check for characters within quotation marks in C#?

I'm reading a CSV file and am trying to check for text within quotation marks.  The idea is that:
- if the string has two pairs of quotation marks, it is valid; skip to the next entry.
- if the string only has one pair of quotation marks, then loop through the rest of the entries until the closing pair of quotation marks is found.  Combine those strings together as you go along, inserting a comma between them.  This is done because the quotation marks contain commas, which should be a part of the collected text.

My problem is that my use of Regex.IsMatch( ) seems to be returning TRUE for the case where only a single quotation marks exists.  How can I make the regular expression return true for text surrounded by quotation marks while returning false for only a single quotation marks character?

for (int i = (int)EColumns.e_colName; i < lineValues.Length; i++) {
 
                                        // We want any single-quotation-mark-set entries
                                        if (lineValues[i].Contains("\""))
                                            if (Regex.IsMatch(lineValues[i], (".*"))) 
                                                // We don't want entries with a matching set already
                                                continue;
                                            else {
                                                //  Search for the entry with the closing quotation marks. Assumed: quotation marks
                                                // are never meant to be contained within quotation marks.
                                                int j = i;
                                                while (!lineValues[++j].Contains("\""))
                                                    ;
 
                                                lineValues[j].Insert(0, ",");
                                                lineValues[i].Insert(lineValues[i].Length, lineValues[j]);
                                            }
                                    }

Open in new window

0
hyliandanny
Asked:
hyliandanny
  • 3
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Stacy SpearCommented:
Can you provide an example of a valid string and an invalid string?
0
 
hyliandannyAuthor Commented:
Certainly.

Sample 1:
"This is a string that I don't want to match because it's surrounded by quotation marks."

Sample 2:
"This is a string I want to find a match because it starts with quotation marks at the start but not at the end to close it.

Sample 3:
Sometime later might come a string that I don't want matched either since it doesn't have quotation marks at all

Sample 4:
but eventually one entry would close it.  This would be a string I do want matched since it has quotation marks at the end."
0
 
numberkruncherCommented:
One way to match literal type content like this is to use an expression like the following:
// The following regular expression matches "anything but a double quote"
 
"[^"]*"
 
 
// The following regular expression matches "abc""def"
// where "" is an escape character.
 
"([^"]|"")*"
 
 
// The following regular expression matches "abc""def
// where where no closing double quote was specified in input.
// Effectively this means that it will encapsulate the entire document
// unless a closing quote is detected.
 
"([^"]|"")*("|$)

Open in new window

0
Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
Stacy SpearCommented:
I'm still not understanding the comma part.

Is each line a separate string?
0
 
hyliandannyAuthor Commented:
I still need to try out numberkruncher's proposed solution, but to answer your question, darkstar3d, the following are either desired for being found a match or not-desired.  Each line you see is a separate string.

"desired

"not-desired"

desired"

not-desired

Commas should not exist in any of the strings inspected, since I split up the entire strings by commas.  I'm getting everything within the commas.  The logic is that if I find a double-quotation (I'll call it the "open double-quotation), then there exist commas between strings such that they belong in a string formed by the open double-quotation and a following double-quotation (which I'll call the closing double-quotation).

It falls to me, then, to insert commas between each string since the commas are actually encompassed by the open double-quotation and closing double-quotation.
0
 
Stacy SpearCommented:
You don't have the original data set so that you can properly escape the commas? Seems to be a better approach than what you are attempting to do now.
0

Featured Post

Hire Technology Freelancers with Gigs

Work with freelancers specializing in everything from database administration to programming, who have proven themselves as experts in their field. Hire the best, collaborate easily, pay securely, and get projects done right.

  • 3
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now