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Resolving External DNS request with Internal DNS

Posted on 2009-04-09
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We are planning to put web servers in the DMZ.
We have an AD domain internally. We don't have public DNS in the DMZ or at the ISP.
We just have registered Public IPs.
Is it possible to resolve external requests from the internal DNS without encurring any security risk?

Thanks
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Question by:jskfan
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by:boat_anker
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I would recommend putting a DNS server in the DMZ to resolve the external requests.

Any time you open a port you increase the risk
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by:brittonv
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The quick answer is "not really."

Regardless, If I were you there are 2 options.  

Use the DNS server of your domain registrar.  Most of them now have managed DNS services.

Secondly install 2 linux dns server on the DMZ on some old hardware.  
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by:tigermatt
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You can use your internal servers as name servers for your external domain. Technically, that is possible.

However, on a security basis, it wouldn't be recommended. You should never open up your internal Active Directory DNS servers to the Internet, since doing so would enable any external user to query any zone on the server, and potential discover the structure and organisation of your internal domain deployment. From a security standpoint, you would need to deploy DNS servers running on more suitable software if you wished to host your own DNS; BIND on a Solaris system is a common recommendation for external name server hosting.

-Matt
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by:jskfan
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<<<You can use your internal servers as name servers for your external domain. Technically, that is possible.>>>

how do you set it up?
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by:tigermatt
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Simply open port 53 and create the appropriate DNS zone. Externally, create a subdomain called 'ns1.yourdomain.com' and set it as an 'A' record to your external public IP address. Then point your nameservers at your domain registrar to ns1.yourdomain.com.

Once you open port 53, be ready to have see your Internet bandwidth usage skyrocket, as you will essentially be opening up a public DNS server to the Internet which has recursion enabled.

DNS via BIND is much more secure, as it allows more granular control over various features, and since it will be dedicated to resolving for your domain, recursion can be disabled.

-Matt
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by:jskfan
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<<<Simply open port 53 and create the appropriate DNS zone. Externally, create a subdomain called 'ns1.yourdomain.com' and set it as an 'A' record to your external public IP address. Then point your nameservers at your domain registrar to ns1.yourdomain.com.>>>
This sounds like I will still need an external DNS (somewhere in the DMZ) with a zone named ns1.mydomai.com.
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Ideally, yes, that is what you need. For security reasons, you need a dedicated box, outside the domain in the DMZ, running BIND on some sort of *nix platform. BIND's implementation of DNS is much more secure than MS DNS, with more granular control.

If you are hosting your own DNS, you also need to strongly consider resilience. Ideally, you have AT LEAST 2 DNS servers in separate sites, so DNS records will still resolve. What you don't want to happen is for your DNS to be taken out; if a mail server, for example, cannot obtain your MX records, it may bounce the mail, rather than wait 2 days to attempt to deliver to your MX record prior to bouncing.

-Matt
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