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Internet connections to Laptop

Posted on 2009-04-09
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
I have an IBM Think Pad and cannot connect to the Internet,
I have a BT Home Hub 2 router connected tp my main PC.
I am connecting via a direct cable from the Home Hub to the Laptop.

I am fairly sure the cable and Hub are OK as the same cable operates another Laptop correctly.
In Device Manage I have one entry under Network adaptors which is
Intel(R)PRO/100 VE Network connection

Network Connections reports Network Cable Uplugged Intel(R)PRO/100 VE Network connection.
I had this problem before and have reinstalled the complete XP OS.
Has anyone ideas what may be wrong please?
Thanks
John
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Question by:johnhardy
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18 Comments
 
LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:Junglegun
Junglegun earned 200 total points
ID: 24110499
Likely the NIC is malfunctioning.
In device manager delete the network adapter.
Then reboot.
Windows will detect and re-install.

Had the same problem not more than 10 minutes ago.
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24110955
Thanks,
Sadly it did not work, I deleted the network adaptor and restarted but the result is the same as above.
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:jaketo
jaketo earned 200 total points
ID: 24152796
is the driver for your nic installed try re-installing your driver.
second option is to try another cable.ave seen situations where a particular cable works on one laptop and doesnt on the next.
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Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24152896
Thanks
Good point about the cable I have three and have tried them all.
I am going to try a new wireless card. There is I believe a card that is made for the Think pad and I believe uses an arial built into the screen. Will come back with more news later.
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24160766
I have now fitted the card, I believe there is somewhere I have to add the admin password and wirless access key from the hub. Can you say where this is entered please?
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24218887
The card was the wrong card. I replaced the card and the new card asked for the number on the BT Hub.
I can get the laptop connected to the internet now if the laptop is close by say 10feet. If I go into another room then the connection fails.
Any ideas
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24271297
Still the same
Anyone?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:goodoldave
ID: 24271483
A couple of ideas...

a) Sounds like there may be something nearby which is causing interference for your wireless NIC, like some other appliance or even a neighboring wireless switch.  Is there anythign else in the room that might cause interference?  I think I read somewhere that neighboring wireless networks needs to be five channels away from each other or else they'll be stepping on eath other's toes.  Try changing the frequency.

b) Try giving your NIC a static IP address for your subnet.  If the IP address is different from what your main router is, you'll get false messages about having no conenctions becuase network traffic won't be going to your NIC. This will also take care of any DHCP issues.

c)Wait a minute.  Does the BT in your hub's name stand for Bluetooth?  Doesn't Bluetooth have a maximum range of 10 feet or so?   It's meant for peripherals like mice, not long range networking.
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24271573
Thanks Dave
BT stands for British Telecom
I am very unknowledgeable about NICS and Networks but have a contact coming round to see if he can assist. I will print out your ideas and see what he can make of these.
Cheers
John
0
 

Expert Comment

by:goodoldave
ID: 24271754
No problem.  Personanly, I'm putting my money on b).  When you connect your conputer to the internet, yorr provider will give you one, as in O-N-E IP address for your computer.  If you have multiple computers, you can only use one at a time.  You can get around this by a) putting a home router between your comnputers and the internet, and B) giving your computers their own IP addresses. The router will tell your IP provider to pretend that your multiple computers are really all the same computer

I suspect your gadgets are working fine, they just need to be configured differently from the way you're trying to do it.
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Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24271893
Thanks Dave
Will be in touch
John
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Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24334820
I have had to conclude this is a hardware problem somewhere which no one has been able to fix so I have replaced the machine
Thanks for all the support.
John
0
 

Expert Comment

by:goodoldave
ID: 24337287
It would be interesting to see what network address your laptop is picking up.  I'll wager anything it either can't get a good address or it has an address that doesn't want to play with your network.  Now that you have two network connections (the one with the wire and one with the wireless)  *something* should be picking up *something*.

FYI a router and a hub are two different things.  A hub is like a street intersection with no street lights or traffic police.  They'll let the network traffic from a number of computers go through to anywhere it wants to go but it won't lift a finger to help any of it get through it, which can cause "collisions" (and that's the actual network term for it).  A router is like a a street intersection with lights AND traffic police.  It not only regulates network traffic but also gives it directions to where it wants to go and also keeps unauthorized network traffic out.  Thus, the answer to your problem will almost certainly depend on whether you genuinely have a hub or genuinely have a router.  For one thing, there's no such thing as a wireless hub, so you may not even be able to use wireless cards with it.

If British Telecom is mixing and matching the terms indiscriminately then they need to fire their tech writers.
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24337588
Thanks for the extra info.
I understand (better now) what you are saying.
The details of the BT Hub are here, they will make more sense to you than me!
http://www.shop.bt.com/bundleview.aspx?quicklinx=56B4&bdi=1042

Unfortunately the machine crashes quite a lot in spite of an OS reinstall so I expect its hardware somewhere. Anyway now redundant!
Regards
John
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
goodoldave earned 1600 total points
ID: 24338821
Ah, thanks.  Yes, their writeup is pretty bad.  Your device is a router, not a hub.   BUT...I think it may explain why you've having issues.  

The "N" technology they're referring to is a different way that wireless routers work these days.  Previous wireless routers (the "B" and "G" flavors) intentionally weed out any copies of signals it receives after the original signal it already received, under the assumption that it's just an echo of the original signal being bounced around the walls.  The "N" version specifically listens for these secondary signals to double check the quality of the first signal.  If you have an "N" router and a "B" or "G" wireless card, you have to specifically tell the router to use "Legacy" mode to get all the different flavors to play nice together, otherwise the router might be expecting to talk only to other "N" devices (called "Greenfield" mode), and it won't work.  

Is your machine crashing from an ugly looking blue or black screen, seconds after you see the Windows logo?  My IBM Thinkpad had that very problem, and it turned out to be a bad hard drive.  I replaced the hard drive, reinstalled the OS, and it's been behaving itself nicely ever since.  That might be something you can try yourself.  At the very least, it's a cheaper solution to try than replacing the whole thing, and they're *very* easy to swap out.

Thus, your problem might actually be multiple problems, masquerading as one.
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24339239
Thanks so much for the further info
I will look into this, bouncing around walls is a good point. I wondered about this.
Amazing what there is to know!!
Cheers
John
0
 

Author Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 24362290
A little more info.
I think the crashing was caused by a badly fitted card. Rectified that and it hasnt crashed since!

A more competent friend changed the hub/router settings but there was no improvement. I did take the laptop while it was connected and close to the router and walk it through to my other room, where it showed signal strength as excellent and it lasted for about 3 minutes. As soon as I took it back close to the router it reconnected.
BT are going toi send me a new type of router soon so I will try that.
Regards
John
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:johnhardy
ID: 31568642
It does not look as if this problem will be solved but thanks so much for all the help anyway. There is so much to know! New laptop is fine!
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