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tar -xf tar: fatal: libintl.so.8 error

Hi Experts,

When I try to use the tar -xf pcns223sol.tar, I receive the following:

tar pcns223sol.tar
ld.so.1: tar: fatal: libintl.so.8: open failed: No such file or directory
Killed

I just ran this same file on another test server without issue.

Any ideas on what might be causing this tar error to occur?

Thanks,
byd2k
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byd2k
Asked:
byd2k
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3 Solutions
 
Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
That is odd. Do "which tar", the normal tar on Solaris doesn't link with libintl.so.8. Are you using gnu tar or something else by mistake?
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byd2kAuthor Commented:
I or the contractor probably installed GNU at one point in time hoping it would correct a similar issue a long time ago.  Is there a way to not use GNU tar and use the default version?

Thanks again,
byd2k

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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
Sure. The short term solution is to simply call tar by it's full path:

/usr/bin/tar -xf pcns223sol.tar

But you could still do the "which tar" to find out where it is installed and adjust your path.
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byd2kAuthor Commented:
Great that worked!  

The application looks like it actually wants to use Tar to extract additional data.

How do you uninstall or adjust the existing path /usr/local/bin/tar to /usr/bin/tar permanently?

Thanks,
byd2k

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omarfaridCommented:
look at the PATH env variable, which contains dir names to look for  commands

echo $PATH
PATH=/usr/bin:path1:path2
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Brian UtterbackPrinciple Software EngineerCommented:
Somewhere on you path is certainly /usr/local/bin. Also, there is /usr/bin. Your choices are to either uninstall the /usr/local/bin/tar file or swtich them around on your PATH variable, or always call tar as /usr/bin/tar.
The problem with the first is that somebody may be using /usr/local/bin/tar. The problem with the second is that you may find that there are other executables in /usr/local/bin that you want to take precedence over what is in /usr/bin, and the last one is a pain. You have to figure out which is best.

If you do decide to reverse the order on the PATH, look in a file called .login, or .profile or .cshrc (depending on you shell) in your home directory. That is most likely where /usr/local/bin is added to the path.
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byd2kAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your help.

I decided to create another user account in which the default tar version is stored under /usr/bin/tar.  I then used sudo for admin rights versus running root to install an updated APC network shutdown application.

Thanks to all of your for your help,
byd2k
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byd2kAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for your help.

I ended up creating a new user.  I used that user's default profile which used /usr/local/bin/tar file.  I proceeded to install the APC application which in turn used the default tar program to install Java.

I'm going to leave the path alone abased on blu's last post.

-byd2k
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