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Cisco PIX internal interface and internal router interface

Posted on 2009-04-10
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I have the following setup:
Internet -------------------- Cisco PIX ------- DMZ - 10.172.192.0 network
                                       /         |          
 Internal IP - 192.168.1.5     |            
                                                 | -------------Cisco Switch--Internal LAN 192.168.1.0      
                                                 |
 DR ----   Cisco Router ---------Internal  IP: 192.168.1.254

Default gateway is set to 192.168.1.254 for all clients.
The issue is to reach the DMZ, we have to set the gateway as 192.168.1.5.
What needs to be done on the firewall or the router to reach the DMZ with all the computers set for gateway of 192.168.0.254 and they can reach all the networks.
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Question by:TopTechie
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JFrederick29 earned 500 total points
ID: 24116593
Add a route to the router:

conf t
ip route 10.172.192.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.5
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Author Comment

by:TopTechie
ID: 24116867
Actually the route is added. I forgot to mention, the VPN users cannot access any machines unless the machines are set to 192.168.1.5 (the PIX interface). If I set it to 192.168.1.254 they don't even ping.

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by:JFrederick29
JFrederick29 earned 500 total points
ID: 24116887
So you still can't access the DMZ hosts?

You also need a route to the VPN pool of addresses on the router.

ip route x.x.x.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.5

Where x.x.x.0 is the VPN subnet.
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Expert Comment

by:shirkan
ID: 24138725
if your LAN is 192.168.0.x then your default gateway needs to be on the same Network not 192.168.1.254 but rather 192.168.0.x

like Fred says, on the router you need

ip route 10.172.192.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.5
ip route x.x.x.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.5

and on the ASA you need a route back for the 192.168.0.x Network

route inside 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.254 (guessing)

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