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Adjusting flash to screen size as a projector

Posted on 2009-04-13
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Last Modified: 2013-11-11
I want a flash projector that runs on the local computer to adjust to the screen size of the viewer.  How do I do this?
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Question by:Dier02
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by:quizengine
ID: 24128570
You've got three issues to address.

1) the version of actionscript in the movie (AS2 and AS3 have slightly different commands to achieve what you want)

2) The resolution of the screen it's being viewed on, and

3) The aspect ratio of the screen(s) being viewed on

Do you know the answer(s) to any of these questions ? (I imagine that you may want 2 & 3 to cover *all* screens, and I'll answer that, but knowing the answer to 1) is quite important. If you don't know the answer but can post the .fla then I can find out.)
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by:Dier02
ID: 24128697
AS2
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by:Dier02
ID: 24128703
And yes, "all" is what I want
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by:quizengine
ID: 24128738
Ok. There are two bits of code. These are

fscommand("fullscreen", true);

This forces the Flash Player to go full screen. But two things to bear in mind. Firstly, is the 'aspect ratio' of your movie. That's the relation between the height and width. E.g. if the original size of the Flash stage was, say 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 (a typical 'square' PC resolution) then if that were 'fullscreened' on a more modern *widescreen* display, say 1360 x 768 or 1680 x 1050, then you would get black bars left and right of the screen. Very similar, in fact, to when you see an old 4:3 TV programme on a widescreen TV.

Now at this point you have a choice to make. Do I allow the Flash movie to be scaled to fit the screen perfectly. E.g to 'stretch' a 1024 x 768 .swf to perfectly fit (no black bars) a 1360 x 768 screen ? If you do want to allow that, use the code

fscommand("allowscale, "true");

The penalty for allowing this is that elements of your movie may distort unacceptably. For example what was a perfect circle at 1024x768 becomes a squashed ovoid at widescreen.

One possible course might be to let the user choose with these fullscreen and scaling commands being attached to buttons.

One final thing on scaling. If your original movie's stage size is *smaller* than the user's screen res, and you go fullscreen, any *bitmap* images, or video clips in your movie will *pixelate*. How badly they do this will depend on how much the resolution has been increased by. If the content of your movie is entirely *vector* (text and 'shapes') then this is not a problem - always a good argument for using vector artwork whereever possible.

Hope that is enlightening.

Oh, and one last thing - although this situation is probably much less common, the reverse of the 4:3 -> widescreen can occur. This is where you create a widescreen .swf and the user has a 4:3 screen. Here, if you use allowscale, their circles become vertically elongated instead of squashed, and you get black horizontal bars (top and bottom of the screen) if you don't permit scaling.
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quizengine earned 500 total points
ID: 24128740
and if you want to use 'allowscale' you should issue that command *before* using the fullscreen one.
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by:Dier02
ID: 24129129
Thanks
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