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Finding DNS Name from IP

Posted on 2009-04-13
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Last Modified: 2012-05-06
I'm looking for the DNS name and MAC address for an IP that I have.  What is the command line syntax for this?  My ip address is 172.22.93.206
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Question by:akdreaming
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 24132688
If you are trying to look up that IP, it lives in a range of IP's set aside for internal use.
... Thinkpads_User
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by:akdreaming
ID: 24132729
Yes I understand this.  However, internally, I can ping this device...it lives on my network.  Can't I do perform a command to bring back the hostname of this device?
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Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 24132758
The command you're looking for is "ping -a [IP address]" (without the quotes of course).  This will return the name of the device, provided that there is a NetBIOS name registered in DNS or WINS for that device.
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Hypercat (Deb) earned 125 total points
ID: 24132788
Then, "arp -a [IP address]" will return the MAC address, provided that machine's IP address is in your ARP cache.
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by:akdreaming
ID: 24132796
Yes, this actually does work.  But you are right...there isn't a NetBIOS name registered....can I force this to happen.  This is for a weird Xerox poster printer which is networked of course, but I'm trying to retrieve the NetBIOS name.  Does it have one?
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Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 24132905
The only way to do this would be to enable dynamic DNS updates on the device, or manually register the device in DNS (or WINS if you're using it).  Most devices like this do have a host name, which can be registered in DNS, but sometimes the host name is just a series of numbers and letters.  For example, HP laser printers generally have a host name beginning with "NPI" followed by a series of letters and/or numbers that represent the last 6 digits of the MAC address.
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